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How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

This is the place to talk about Bio-Medical Electronics
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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Granz » Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:49 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 3rd, 2014, 06:32 PM by Granz

Jason, still here - just keeping my peace while you and Chris were talking about the Prop timing stuff. I know a little bit about the Prop, but Chris is in another league, completely - he has a nice advantage with his "day job."

After one of my earlier posts, I decided that, what we needed was, a mind reading computer! The most popular method of a computer reading a user's mind, is to use standard EEG-type electrodes and do some signal processing. I went to Hack-A-Day, and started looking for EEG-related articles - it was amazing, there is a huge amount of stuff, for hobbyists, dealing with EEG reading.

There is an OpenEEG group, working on helping people get hold of, and make use of, low-cost EEG headbands. HaD has an article about them at: http://hackaday.com/2013/06/01/off-the- ... ur-dreams/. One of the people has been able to communicate with his equipment using thought-driven Morse code - that may be a way to go; if Lisa could learn Morse code, then she could communicate better (maybe have the computer listening in for commands from her, and anything that the computer does not recognize could be treated as a message to a human, and output in human-readable format (computer-generated spoken word, written on a display screen, etc.,) for the people around her.

You asked about the Raspberry Pi; that is a higher-level control system; actually a Linux computer. You would be able to run stuff on that which would not run on an Atmel or Propeller chip; stuff like the higher-end analysis of the signals, etc. Since Linux comes with (or you can download) Python, the Python library for the EEG headset (http://hackaday.com/2010/09/13/python-l ... motiv-eeg/) should run on a Pi.

Some of the actual implementations that I saw there seem to be doable. (Do a search for EEG, on Hack-A-Day yourself and look at the cool stuff - caution: huge time sink! There are tonnes (yes, the metric kind, which are bigger than our English tons) of stuff there. ) Here are a few of the ones that I saw that we may want to include in our experimenting:

http://hackaday.com/2011/04/29/eeg-assi ... d-control/ - A project from the Washington University School of Engineering, where they built a device to "read a user's mind" to help control their hand. There is a pretty detailed discussion, but no schematics, technical drawings or software. However, they do have a pretty extensive bibliography, along with four links to related studies/projects.

http://hackaday.com/2010/12/10/eeg-the-locomotion/ - A project, where a guy controls a wheel chair with his mind. This is still in the experimental/testing phase, but it looks like it really exists, right now. At the bottom of this article, is a link to an article about a wheelchair which allows a two-year-old to explore (IIRC the chair provides a bit of "adult supervision" - you know, like "heck no! I am not going to slam into that wall for you, you think I'm nuts?") My work is blocking the link right now, so I am depending on my memory of seeing the linked article quite a while back.

http://hackaday.com/2013/02/04/adaptive ... elicopter/ - This is about a guy who is able to control a model helicopter with his mind. The article says that he is using the muscles in his neck to control the 'copter, so I am not sure if this would work for Lisa - I need some more study about ALS, and where, along the nerve "cables" the signals degenerate, or die. If the signals are allowed to travel a bit along the cables, then this might be of some use. Either way, it's a pretty cool concept.


Since, Lisa is not able to blink (or at least, not reliably) then this may not be of use: http://hackaday.com/2013/06/20/building ... ut-device/, but some of the ideas presented may be able to be used in our experimenting, anyway. We should probably start our experimentation on the physical control system to begin with, but we need to keep in mind the user interface (not the electronic signal processing, but the "Hello, Lisa, I'm Jarvis, and Tony Stark asked me to help with taking care of some of your needs. What do you want me to do for you now?" stuff) in mind for later on. Baby steps, here, Jarvis comes later.
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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Granz » Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:54 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 3rd, 2014, 07:01 PM by Granz

Funny how things work out. Immediately after my last post, I went over to Instructables (entertainment reading, along with HaD,) and saw this: http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspber ... Assistant/

Not a lot that is directly usable in Project Lisa, but it was interesting that someone has come up with a physical Jarvis. (Of course, it has already been done: Siri, for Apple's mobile OS, and another Instructable - http://www.instructables.com/id/JARVIS- ... ol-Center/.) We can keep these ideas in the back of our minds for Lisa's Digital Assistant.
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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Wed Jun 03, 2015 12:08 am

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 3rd, 2014, 07:30 PM by ElectronsRfun

Originally Posted by Granz

After one of my earlier posts, I decided that, what we needed was, a mind reading computer! The most popular method of a computer reading a user's mind, is to use standard EEG-type electrodes and do some signal processing. I went to Hack-A-Day, and started looking for EEG-related articles - it was amazing, there is a huge amount of stuff, for hobbyists, dealing with EEG reading.


Thanks for writing back. I agree strongly that mind control is the best bet. The problem is, interpreting the different style of mind waves is based on concentrating. When a person is aspirating of just wakes up from a dead sleep they can't concentrate correctly. Lisa will eventually not be able to move anything and will only appear to "STARE" into space while her mind is still working correctly. Very Scary days for me! I know families that have gone through this. I have to defeat or work around her ALS before this happens.

Here check this out if you would like:


http://www.broadenedhorizons.com/brainfingers (link is bad as of June 03,2015)

Dr. Junker has done everything you have talked about but after talking to the owner of Broaden Horizons ( I think his name is Mark) he said the system is really a last ditch effort and is not very reliable. It also requires special training that is about $300 and is not refundable. I have the STAR WARS force trainer, Here it is:

https://www.google.com/#q=star+wars+for ... afe=active

which I believe works in a similar way. I thought since a persons brain patterns determine how fast a fan is spinning to move a ball in a tube, I could feed the voltage reference for fan control into an ADC and when the ADC voltage is in between certain values Lisa could control different things based on the variable voltage output for the motor.

Also Parallax just had a contest involving medical innovations and a young high school student did a project were he used mind control to move a prosthetic arm with fingers. During the awards ceremony it took him several minutes to get his innovation under control. I think he used an Arduino. I recently looked into the sensor apparatus he used for his project, they are about a $100 but the real problem is; Lisa is in bed all the time and I don't think the device will fit correctly onto her head while resting on a pillow. The device also clamps to both ears. I don't think Lisa will like that.

The force trainer headset does fit on Lisa's head without clamping to her ears. I would like to hack the force trainer to see if I can get that to work. The brain fingers set up, I think also requires some conducting gel all the time.

Originally Posted by Granz
Since, Lisa is not able to blink (or at least, not reliably) then this may not be of use: http://hackaday.com/2013/06/20/build...-input-device/, but some of the ideas presented may be able to be used in our experimenting, anyway. We should probably start our experimentation on the physical control system to begin with, but we need to keep in mind the user interface (not the electronic signal processing, but the "Hello, Lisa, I'm Jarvis, and Tony Stark asked me to help with taking care of some of your needs. What do you want me to do for you now?" stuff) in mind for later on. Baby steps, here, Jarvis comes later.

You cracked Lisa and I up by mentioning Tony Stark and "Jarvis" Lisa even cracked a smile! and that's saying something. Jarvis is great! and is the ultimate goal for many people I would suspect.

I thought about Morse code several times also. I can't remember if Forrest talked about a project involving that or if it was someone else. The problem is Lisa can only reliable move the magnet very little or as much as she can. Her fine motor control is gone and she has no muscle orientation awareness. I also thought about using short hand symbols for Lisa to string words and concepts together.

Ultimately I think mind control is the goal, because Lisa will very likely need it, but it needs to be reliable, easy and comfortable to wear, and be able to use 24/7. As long as Lisa or other patient can move their eyes that is an option with facial recognition or eye tracking tech. Lisa has been able to move her eyebrow about 1/4" for several years but that ability is diminishing and she is now experiencing an inability to distinguish the difference between a full eyebrow lift and a small eyebrow lift. But that is why I learned the LM3914 chip and I drive a 20 segment LED Bar graph that helps her to understand her orientation in her eyebrow lifting.

Is there something specific you want me to do or learn? Lisa calling me again

Jason

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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Granz » Wed Jun 03, 2015 3:31 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 3rd, 2014, 09:00 PM by Granz

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun
Thanks for writing back. I agree strongly that mind control is the best bet. The problem is, interpreting the different style of mind waves is based on concentrating. When a person is aspirating of just wakes up from a dead sleep they can't concentrate correctly. Lisa will eventually not be able to move anything and will only appear to "STARE" into space while her mind is still working correctly. Very Scary days for me! I know families that have gone through this. I have to defeat or work around her ALS before this happens.

Here check this out if you would like:

http://www.broadenedhorizons.com/brainfingers (note: link is broken as of June 3,2015)

Yeah, that looks pretty good - for a large price. Maybe, with the UL (and other) testing, it is worth the price, but...

Take a look at the What it Does section:
Even users with minimal ability to control facial muscles can usually learn how to map "clicks" to a number of special controls.

Lisa will need to be able to control her facial muscles to run this system. I'm thinking that we will need to go elsewhere for this project. BTW, this is also implied in both the How it Works section, and also in the Technically Speaking sections.

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun View Post
...
I have the STAR WARS force trainer, Here it is:

https://www.google.com/search?q=star+wa ... tive&cad=h

which I believe works in a similar way. I thought since a persons brain patterns determine how fast a fan is spinning to move a ball in a tube, I could feed the voltage reference for fan control into an ADC and when the ADC voltage is in between certain values Lisa could control different things based on the variable voltage output for the motor.

The force trainer headset does fit on Lisa's head without clamping to her ears. I would like to hack the force trainer to see if I can get that to work. The brain fingers set up, I think also requires some conducting gel all the time.


That looks like it might be worth looking into (especially, since you already own one.) I looked at the Amazon page (http://www.amazon.com/Star-Wars-Science ... B001UZHASY) for this toy, and it looks very positive for testing. If you notice, in the Q&A section, someone asked about the transmission interface. The thing seems to be using Zigbee - I have a set of xBee cards, which I received with a BAHBOT controller (http://www.wrighthobbies.com/product.ph ... 144&page=1) when I wrote a datasheet for the controller. I believe that Eddie's xBee card (http://www.wrighthobbies.com/product.ph ... 132&page=1,) will interface with ZigBee, but we can experiment with them. (I also have one of the carrier boards http://www.wrighthobbies.com/product.ph ... 145&page=1 for the xBee modules.) (As of June 3, 2015 wrighthobbies links don't work, they seem to be out of business?) We can check up on that, and I can send you my xBee cards to see if you can read the radio waves directly from your headset. If you can, then we are a huge step forward in Project Lisa.

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun
You cracked Lisa and I up by mentioning Tony Stark and "Jarvis" Lisa even cracked a smile! and that's saying something. Jarvis is great! and is the ultimate goal for many people I would suspect.

Good - I wish that I could have seen Lisa's smile. That is one type of Biblical medicine (Proverbs 17:22 - A merry heart does good, like medicine, or as Reader's Digest puts it: Laughter, the best medicine.)

Originally Posted by [b]ElectronsRfun[/b]
I thought about Morse code several times also. I can't remember if Forrest talked about a project involving that or if it was someone else. The problem is Lisa can only reliable move the magnet very little or as much as she can. Her fine motor control is gone and she has no muscle orientation awareness. I also thought about using short hand symbols for Lisa to string words and concepts together.

When I was talking about Morse Code, I was not thinking about just using a finger, or something, to physically push a Morse Code keyer. Rather, if Lisa can move anything (like the ball on the Jedi trainer,) then she can "send" Morse code. If she, for example, moves the ball to the 2nd level for a dot, and the 3rd level, say, for a dash... Letting the ball rest on level 1 could be the space between letters/words/sentances/etc. With this kind of setup, she could communicate with her computer or people (perhaps, instructing the computer to convey her message to the humans around her.) How well that works will remain to be seen in Lisa's testing, of course - if she cannot use it, then it isn't worth a whole lot (other than helping guide us to other things that will work better.)

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun

Is there something specific you want me to do or learn? Lisa calling me again

Jason

Yes, try to find out if the Jedi trainer really does use ZigBee. I will go ahead and try to hunt down my xBee modules, and make sure that they will actually communicate with ZigBee. If those things work out, I will ship my modules to you, and you, and Lisa, can begin experimenting to see if she can make something happen on the computer. Even just changing a ZigBee data stream will be a large advance in our experimenting.
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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Granz » Wed Jun 03, 2015 4:51 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 3rd, 2014, 09:53 PM by Granz

Oh, yeah, one other thing for you to do: Ask Lisa to play with the Jedi trainer. The better she gets at following Yoda's commands, the better she will be able to control the new system. In addition, that will give you an instant communication system; it will be similar to the old "blink once for 'yes', and twice for 'no'" system. Although, you guys probably have something like that, huh?

Anyway, see if she can get to the Jedi Master level, and then see if there are more possibilities (such as placing the ball between the 1st, 2nd and 3rd levels) that she can reach with some repeatability. The more "positions" at which she can place the ball, the higher her bandwidth for communicating with her system (and thus, with you.)
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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Wed Jun 03, 2015 4:55 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 3rd, 2014, 11:12 PM by ElectronsRfun

Originally Posted by Granz
Yes, try to find out if the Jedi trainer really does use ZigBee. I will go ahead and try to hunt down my xBee modules, and make sure that they will actually communicate with ZigBee. If those things work out, I will ship my modules to you, and you, and Lisa, can begin experimenting to see if she can make something happen on the computer. Even just changing a ZigBee data stream will be a large advance in our experimenting.

Hey Granz,

I have the xBee starter kit sold by Parallax. It is here: http://www.parallax.com/product/32450 will that help?

I did notice the Amazon review talking about Zigbee before I bought the Force Trainer. I thought Since they are extremely similar, I could learn how the Zigbee works by going through my xBee starter kit.

It is my understanding that xBee can not communicate with Zigbee. I read xBee only uses part of the Zigbee protocol.

I will look into the Force Trainer and what wireless tech it uses.

The Brain Fingers is pricey, that's why I never got it for Lisa. The cost of such technology is why I started looking into making the LISA alarm more affordable and user friendly for ALS patients and their families.

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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:04 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 4th, 2014, 02:16 AM by ElectronsRfun

Originally Posted by Granz
Yes, try to find out if the Jedi trainer really does use ZigBee. I will go ahead and try to hunt down my xBee modules, and make sure that they will actually communicate with ZigBee. If those things work out, I will ship my modules to you, and you, and Lisa, can begin experimenting to see if she can make something happen on the computer. Even just changing a ZigBee data stream will be a large advance in our experimenting.

Hi Art,

I found these things.

FCC website is here: https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/ ... Search.cfm

in the grantee box type XCY
in the applicant box type Uncle Milton
then search

the headset is XCY150511UM12009
the base is XCY150512UM12009

The pictures are good on the Fcc web site. I don't know what the chips are though.

Also here is someone who hacked the headset and got it to connect to his computer. The hacker talks about the communication in the comments section alot.

Both parts are here: http://www.zibri.org/2009/09/success.html

and here: http://www.zibri.org/2009/09/may-force-be-with-you.html

I hope this is what you wanted me to do?

Jason

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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Granz » Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:06 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 4th, 2014, 09:05 AM by Granz

Pot 'o Gold!

This thing is way better than I was hoping. Maxim provides free samples of all of their products. Go ahead and request a couple of these 3233s, wire up a board and see what Lisa can do with the data stream with Hyperterm (or whatever terminal you prefer.) (You may want to write a simple bar graph display program (include all three numbers from the headset) and let Lisa try to control them - it may be a bit easier for her than just raw numbers, especially since she is not into numbers.

Let's see what she can do - try to get the range of numbers that come in to the serial port. I will guess that the numbers range from 0 to 255 (one byte) but It could be higher.
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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:12 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 5th, 2014, 05:24 AM by ElectronsRfun with edits

This is all new to me.

I'll call Maxim tomorrow, I mean today. I believe you want me to hook the 3233 IC to the base and not the headset. Is that correct? I think you would want me to get the 3233E which can be powered by 3.3 volts.

Art, I have to tell you, doing all this will take me some time because I barely even know what ASCII and RS232 are. I believe they are different type of SPI communication protocol. I have seen ASCII used in the LCD documentation for the Parallax. I think RS232 is Full Duplex communication (both ways) were I think RS422 or RS485 is half duplex? I believe in the propeller library there is a full duplex serial, a full duplex serial plus, and an I2C object. I have used the full duplex object before but I would not know how to use the program in this instance. Sorry for my ignorance. I think therefore I learn, so it will just take time. I know Chris wrote up something about this stuff because I saw it the other day, which is why I even know the little I know. I will read the entire article completely and see if that helps me get on track. As I mentioned I have the xBee starter kit from Parallax but have not even cracked the box. Chris did say the book will give some good explanations so I'll probably have to read through it.

Jason

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Re: How to Help a 99.9% paralyzed person

Postby Granz » Wed Jun 03, 2015 5:22 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 5th, 2014, 11:48 AM by Granz

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun
This is all new to me.

I'll call Maxim tomorrow, I mean today. I believe you want me to hook the 3233 IC to the base and not the headset. Is that correct? I think you would want me to get the 3233E which can be powered by 3.3 volts.

Rather than call them, you will want to get onto their web site (http://www.maximintegrated.com/datashee ... or#Samples,) click on the Register button, create an account and then click on the Sample button. I believe that you can order up to three samples - go ahead and order them all, in case the magic smoke escapes from one (or two.) ;) Don't feel like you are taking advantage of their generosity - you are working on designing a product (whether you sell it or put it up on something like Instructables) which will lead to higher sales of that chip. This is the purpose of Sample programs.

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun View Post
Art, I have to tell you, doing all this will take me some time because I barely even know what ASCII and RS232 are. I believe they are different type of SPI communication protocol. I have seen ASCII used in the LCD documentation for the Parallax. I think RS232 is Full Duplex communication (both ways) were I think RS422 or RS485 is half duplex? I believe in the propeller library there is a full duplex serial, a full duplex serial plus, and an I2C object. I have used the full duplex object before but I would not know how to use the program in this instance. Sorry for my ignorance. I think therefore I learn, so it will just take time. I know Chris wrote up something about this stuff because I saw it the other day, which is why I even know the little I know. I will read the entire article completely and see if that helps me get on track. As I mentioned I have the xBee starter kit from Parallax but have not even cracked the box. Chris did say the book will give some good explanations so I'll probably have to read through it.
Jason


ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange - Please do NOT call it A-S-C-2, as some others insist on calling it [SHUDDER]) - since, the only thing that you can store in computers is numbers (actually, just voltage levels, but we represent those as numbers,) then we need a code to represent letters, punctuation, commands, etc. ASCII is just a more detailed version of the old "1=A, 2=B, 3=C, ..." code that you used when you were a little kid. Our code (ASCII) gives us the ability to transmit the entire alphabet (upper- and lower-case), numerals, punctuation, and some commands/descriptions such as Beginning-of-transmission, End-of-transmission, Proceed-with-transmission, Please-hold-your-transmssion, etc. You can find a more detailed description of the ASCII code on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascii_code.)

RS-232 - This is a protocol (a protocol is just a set of rules that everyone agrees to follow to get a job done - in this case everyone agrees to follow these rules to transmit data) to allow data to be transmitted over a serial line. Data can be sent across wires in either serial, or parallel, format. In parallel, all of the bits in a piece of data would be sent at the same time across multiple wires (a separate wire for each bit of data,) in the case of our ASCII code, you would need 7 bits (bit [Binary digIT] - the smallest amount of data that can be stored, it can be either a zero or a one - look up binary numbering system for more information) of data to transmit, or store, a single alphabetic character or a numeral. This would mean that you must have, at least, 7 physical wires to transmit one character in parallel. On the other hand, serial communication allows a piece of data to be sent, bit by bit, across a single wire. Nice savings over having to pay for 8 (or more) wires for each data cable. Without a protocol to define which bit you send first, second, third, etc. you would never be able to determine what data was being sent. The RS-232 protocol defines stuff like that (among many other things, such as the voltages used, etc.) RS-422 and RS-485 are other protocols for serial data transmission.

In any of those protocols, data can be transmitted either one direction at a time (simplex) or both directions at a time (duplex.) In some of the older circuits, there was all of the wiring needed to handle data transmission in both directions, but the protocol (or rules) allowed data to be sent only one direction at a time. This was similar to the telephone system that you use to call your friends; you can both talk at the same time, but neither one of you would get much out of the conversation. This was considered partial duplex; the capability for duplex was there, but not used simultaneously. Newer computers have the ability to both talk and listen at exactly the same time - this would be the full-duplex, that you mentioned. Simple, and full, duplex would be a sub-protocol of the full RS-232 (or RS-422, or RS-485) protocol that you use for your communication.

OK, Teach just gave the podium back to Experimenter.

Image

So, you will need to open the base unit of your Force Trainer and look for the 2x6 male header shown in the photo. Make sure that you have the board oriented with the larger hole above the header, and the white circle, with the white half-circle, below the header. That way, your connections will match up with Zibri's circuit drawing. The DB-9 connector on the right side of his diagram is where you will plug in the serial cable from your computer. If your computer does not have any serial connectors (most newer computers only have USB,) then you will need to get a USB-to-Serial adaptor ($10-$15 from E-Bay.)

Once you have the circuit built and hooked up to your computer, then just launch Hyperterm (or any other terminal program) and watch the data coming in from Lisa, via the Force Trainer. It should look like the listing of numbers shown in Zibri's comments below the article. Play around with this, and make sure that you get numbers, and that Lisa can change those numbers (preferably intentionally.) After that, we can start looking at writing programs to make use of the data coming in from Lisa. Those programs can be on either a full PC (or Mac) or on a microcontroller (Atmel or PIC, Arduino, Propeller, etc.)
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