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Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

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Electrons-R-Fun
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Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Thu May 28, 2015 1:08 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on January 28th, 2014, 01:55 AM by ElectronsRfun

Hi all,

I thought I would post my Provisional Patent Application for people to view. It is my hope by posting this information others can be quickly brought up to speed on what I have done and what I want to do. The 50 pages have been condensed down from about 300 pages of notes and efforts from trying to describe what I have done and want to do for ALS patients. I can talk more about what I currently have working and what I have done in more detail if anyone is interested. I can also explain why I have done things a certain way or why I want to do things a certain way.

Basically, the LISA alarm is an effort to give a severely disabled person access to a reliable device they can use to get help 24/7 even while waking from a dead sleep, with an extremely high level of dependability.

In the event someone who may want to file a PPA, they can read through mine and get an idea about how to write one out. I had to cut out about a 1,000 words because it was too large.

So here it is:
Provisional Application for United States Patent

INVENTOR:

Jason Eric Downing

PATENT TITLE:

Linear Integratable System Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm



ABSTRACT:



BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


[005] The subject creative device solves the problems of reestablishing communication and provides a means for the patient to call for assistance reliably by taking advantage of the very limited willful linear movement that even severely affected patient’s posses. The subject device is especially critical and advantageous during an emergency providing a significant improvement over prior art devices which are used in many other cases of ALS, stroke, or severe paralysis.

[006] Prior art communication devices include those manufactured and sold by Tobii ATI and DynaVox/Mayer-Johnson. DynaVox/ Mayer-Johnson and Tobii ATI, utilize eye gaze technology to provide patients the ability to choose letters and select various commands to communicate with the caregiver. Some disadvantages for patients using these devices are; they are often inaccurate because patients lose the ability to focus while in distress, the patients close their eyes, the patient can’t blink willfully, or the patient can’t stare at fixed location on screen to activate selection. Further, most users of eye gaze technology are fatigued after using the technology after only thirty minutes, effectively rendering the entire device useless for the remainder of a day. Further still, many suffers of ALS don’t want to sleep with a ten pound computer over their face with a bright black light screen that must continually stay on. Many patients have a fear that the computer presents a risk of falling on them that makes using the devices unpleasant for a patient to use. Moreover, when spelling errors are made, fixing incorrect text due to a lack of focus can sometimes be more challenging and frustrating than simply remaining silent. Additionally, the DynaVox is typically the size of a mid-size laptop computer, which blocks the view of patient while watching television or movies. The machine is not suited for portability nor does it have any place in a movie theater or other locations where others may be bothered. Finally, the DynaVox device is cost-prohibitive inasmuch as it retails at approximately $24,000 and many insurance plans do not cover the high cost. The device and system described herein is designed to be affordable with a likely selling price less than $2,000 thereby addressing the needs of patients and providing a price that will allow the system to be readily obtained.

[007] Conventional devices are known by the name “ability switch” and are sold by companies such as AMDI and Broaden Horizons. The ability switches sold by these mentioned company’s, are not as safe and reliable as the inventive subject matter disclosed in this application. The conventional switches have problems with staying aligned , lack ease of set up on the patient, cannot be used for prolonged periods of time, and require extensive and difficult adjustment procedures. Additionally these devices suffer from having ineffective methods for attaching the sensor or sensors to the patient to effect proper communication.

[008] There are no devices, readily available today, which can cost effectively and reliably permit ALS patients to communicate with other individuals. New devices, procedures and methods are needed to better serve these patients and their families. The disclosed subject matter seeks to remedy these shortcomings while providing an improved means of patient to caregiver communication to allow the patient to enjoy a more productive and communicative life while feeling assured their needs will be met thereby decreasing stress and allowing the patient to enjoy a longer more satisfying life.
BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
[009] The system described herein relates to devices, systems, and methods for enabling communication between second party individuals and a patients suffering from the consequences of diseases or injury, such as ALS or paralysis, which generally disable the patient’s motor functions, including use of their limbs, neck and facial muscles, and the ability to speak. Frequently, even severely disabled patients have very limited willful linear movement that can be taken advantage of to provide a means of clear communication.

[0010] This system described herein is particularly suitable for a patient who is able to invoke limited willful linear movement of any part of their body, typically near the eyes and eyebrows. With the inventive aspect of the described matter the patient will be able to explain exactly what they want and exactly what may be wrong with them. Prior art systems simply give the patient the ability to answer yes and no questions. Such prior art systems do not allow the patient to explain exactly what is wrong with them. The disclosed matter provides a way for the patient to spell out exactly what is wrong with them which is of paramount importance for the patient and the caregiver.

[0011] A laser pointer can be attached to the patient’s hair. After several different types of lasers were tried, and considering factors such as weight and reliability, a small toy 3-volt laser pointer was attached to a woman’s hair clip. Power was supplied by a DC power supply originated by a battery, but other types of power supplies could also be used including wall power, transmitted power, and the like. The laser was operationally connected (wired) so the patient would be able to turn it on and off, by themselves, using control features provided by our innovative idea.

[0012] The system could further provide an audible beep that let the caregiver know if the patient needed to say something. A exemplary chart is created of large, five-inch or taller letters that allow the patient to place the dot of the laser on the letter they wish to spell. The chart is configured using four lines. The reason a four-line configuration is utilized is that the patient has more strength and control moving their head left and right as opposed to up and down. Therefore, a chart with letters strung out over the width is easier for the patient to use than a tall vertical chart. The last line, contained W, X, Y, Z, and a blank area which can indicate the next word was going to begin, much like the space bar on a keyboard. Also included may be a chart of pictures of important images that portrayed common everyday needs along with some medical emergency concepts to which the patient could point, to speed up important needs.

[0013] As the patient’s illness progresses, however, they eventually lose the ability to move their head. With this loss, the patient can no longer use the laser set up, so a new and effective way to communicate becomes imperative. The time consuming task of asking the patient “yes” and “no” questions to find out what is wrong becomes even more difficult. Many of the patient’s needs are medical emergencies so yes and no questions simply take too long. A person who has never cared for a loved one who is in the condition of an ALS patient cannot understand the strain and desperation it puts on the caregiver. That desperation resulted in a chart change to a simple and fast means of communication with the patient. After reviewing the original design laser chart for many days, the alphabet was broken up into seven lines. This modified chart rearrangement increases the speed and ease of communication with the patient. The modified “Chart” allows the patient to spell exactly what they need to communicate.

The chart is formatted as follows:

[0014]
1) A B C D
2) E F G H
3) I J K L
4) M N O P
5) Q R S T
6) U V W X
7) Y Z space

[0015] The chart is used as follows: The patient alerts the individual they want attention from using the L.I.S.A. alarm, that individual comes to patients bed side and asks the first of two questions. Question one is always: “Is something wrong with your body?” If patient uses their no response, then the assumption can be made patient wants to talk or say something, so the question, “Do you want to say something?” is asked. Asking the same questions in a style that allows a patient to answer no to and then asking the same question in a style that allows the patient to answer yes to has proven to be a reliable method to ensure caregiver and patient understand each other correctly. Let us go back and simulate the patient used their yes response to question one. Now we need to figure out what is wrong with their body. For this example the patient needs suctioning. To spell “suctioning”. The caregiver will ask the patient which number to choose out of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The patient can use their yes response on five, indicating the letter is in row five. Next the caregiver can ask the patient (skipping “Q” because it is almost never used) R, S and the patient will use their yes response on S indicating S is the correct letter. Now to speed things up, the caregiver will ask if they need suctioning, because this is one of the most common “S” words they use, and most likely the most important. The patient will indicate yes for suctioning. Now assuming the patient wants to spell Sore instead of suctioning, when asked if they needed suctioning they would use their no indicator. Then the patient would be asked if there is a vowel, (this helps speed up the spelling process also) ,in this case, they would use their yes indication. Now the patient would be asked “a, e, i, or o”. The patient can respond with their yes on the “o” indicating the correct vowel. Now the caregiver can repeat 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and the patient can indicate yes on five letting the caregiver know the next letter is in row 5. The caregiver can then ask the patient “R” and the patient would indicate yes. If the caregiver is unsure what the patient is trying to spell they can ask the question “is there a vowel?”. In this case the patient would indicate “yes” and the caregiver would repeat “a, e” and the patient once again would use their yes indicator on “e”. Having identified a word, the caregiver can now ask the patient “sore”? To confirm this word the patient would use their yes indication, effectively saying their sore is hurting them and they would like some pain medication or to be repositioned. These types of questions can be asked directly so the caregiver knows what the patient wants with improved accuracy. “One Word Concepts” are the key features of this methodology. These one-word concepts lead to the patient’s needs being met as in the example cited above.

[0016] For the most part the patient’s needs are the same every day. This makes spelling words much faster, as in the suctioning example above. Many “shortcuts” can be employed to speed up what the patient is trying to spell. A few of them are listed herein, like asking if a vowel is next or guessing at the complete word based on their day to day use of certain letters, like in the suctioning example. Other shortcuts used include: after the patient’s alerts the caregiver, the patient is asked if they have an emergency. An emergency is; pain, breathing trouble, Foley catheter leaks, cramps, etc. If patient uses their yes response to “ Do you have an emergency” then the caregiver can run off the list very quickly and let the patient indicate when caregiver has arrived at the correct emergency. After the emergency question, the caregiver can ask the patient if the alert was an accidental trigger, false alerts do happen a few times a day. The reason for the first two questions of “Is there something wrong with your body” or “do you want to say something” helps the caregiver understand were the patient is trying to go in terms of what patient wants to communicate. Knowing in advance what the patient is thinking helps the caregiver to interpret and speed up the spelling process. The final trick to speeding up the spelling process after getting a no response from the patient on the “is there a vowel next” question, the caregiver can ask some of the more common consonants that would likely come after the first letter. An example of this is: assume the patient confirmed “s” as the first letter and no to the next letter being a vowel, the caregiver would then ask the patient if the next letter is “h, t, l, p…” and, most likely, the next letter would be one of those constantans. This process works well for words like; school, shoulder, show, stiff, stay, slow, sling, speaker, spelling, and so forth.

[0017] The innovative chart and method above is easy to use at a hospital. For people just learning to use the chart, like nurses or caregivers, the numbers and corresponding letters can be written out on both sides of a dry erase board, one facing the patient with large bold permanent letters that can be easily read and the other facing the caregiver with smaller permanent letters, to allow for writing the letters down as the patient spells out the word. A white board material would be an ideal solution, along with a place to secure a, thin, dry erase marker. This communication system allows patients, who were previously not in control of their care, to take back control of their own health care by communicating their wishes. This is extremely beneficial for a patient’s mental fortitude and drive to live. Eventually the patient and caregivers memorize the chart and learn how to continue spelling without writing the words down which speed up the process. The final benefit to the chart is the fact it does not need electricity to work, just a person at bed side.
DEFINITIONS
[0018] Invention: The term “Invention” is used herein merely to relate to the inventive idea that is the subject of this Provisional Patent Application to refer to the “concept” being presented. The term “invention” shall not be construed to mean the “literal and legal” translation of the term “invention”; instead it shall pertain to the “concept” being presented. When this Provisional Patent Application is claimed as preference for the future non-provisional patent application then the term “invention” shall be taken at full face value of the “literal and legal” translation of the term.

[0019] Willful Linear Movement: We shall refer to the term “Willful Linear Movement” to define any physical movement made by the user that can be used to detect a signal that may be used to support measurement as required by the inventive idea.

[0020] Hall Switch or Switch System: The term “Hall Switch or Switch System” shall refer to the use of a Hall sensor or plurality of Hall sensors used with a magnet or plurality of magnets that a user will move relative to each other to produce “Signatures” that in turn invoke a switch mode assigned to that signature.

[0021] Mode or Switch Mode: The term “Mode or Switch Mode” shall refer to an element of the LISA alarm that a user can invoke by producing the signature assigned to that mode.

[0022] Sensor Housing: The term “Sensor Housing” shall refer to the casing that houses the sensor and wires.

[0023] Magnet Housing: The term “ Magnet Housing” shall refer to the casing that houses the neodymium magnet or similar magnet with sufficient field strength.

[0024] Block Indicator: The term “Block Indicator” shall refer to the indicator, giving feedback to user and caregiver that the blocking function of the L.I.S.A. alarm is active.

[0025] Natural Rest Position: The Phrase “Natural Rest Position” shall refer to the location the Hall switch system is at when user is not willfully moving the elements relative to each other.

[0026] Returning to Near Rest Position: The term “Returning to Near Rest Position” shall refer to an adjustable voltage threshold used by the controller to determine if the user is moving the magnet back to toward Natural Rest Position. This position is needed due to most users inability to fully relax and completely return the Hall switch system to the Natural Rest Position. The Near Natural Rest Position is a safety feature added to assist users in times of limited movement.

[0027] Matrix Grid: The term “Matrix Grid” shall refer to the apparatus the user uses to communicate with a computer, turn on and off appliances, and use a matrix to select letters to spell out messages to the caregiver.

[0028] Matrix Grid Switch: The term “Matrix Grid Switch” shall refer to one of our exemplary three modes which a user can invoke to control conventional household appliances.

[0029] Scrolling Speed: The term “Scrolling Speed” shall refer to the rate the Matrix Grid self scrolls through the X and Y AXIS’.

[0030] Y- Axis: The term “Y- Axis” shall refer to the vertical row of the matrix grid.

[0031] X-Axis: The term “X-Axis shall refer to the horizontal rows of the matrix grid.

[0032] Tier System: The term “Tier System” shall refer to the circuit dedicated to monitoring the users movements off of “Natural Rest Position” and altering the real time or stored signatures and/or threshold levels after each users failed attempt to invoke any given mode, and finally triggering the alert signal after all tier level attempts have been invoked.

[0033] Anchor Plate: The term “Anchor Plate” shall refer to the entire apparatus grown or grafted into the users skin consisting of the mesh or graft with skin cells, and the anchor mount.

[0034] Anchor mount: The term “Anchor Mount” shall refer to the aspect of the anchor plate that is very smooth and is used to mount the sensor or sensors elements housings to.

[0035] Latch System: The term “Latch System” shall refer to the method we use to temporarily hold and display the maximum voltage generated by primary sensing elements when initially setting the original alert threshold value.

[0036] Original alert threshold: The term “Original alert threshold” shall refer to the input reference value manually set during the alert threshold initial set up process.

[0037] Cube: The term “Cube” shall refer to any remote station capable of receiving and sending a wired or wireless communication signals, including video and audio, to and from the controller and/or other remote stations. The “Cube” shall have the ability to invoke a visual signal, an audio signal, a vibration signal, or any combination thereof.

[0038] Signature: The term “Signature” shall refer to the voltage verses time profile the user produces by moving the Hall sensor switch elements in relation to each other.

[0039] Learned Behavior Signature: The term “Learned Behavior Signature” shall refer to the voltage verse time profile that was produce by users willful movement during initial setup which is recorded by the controller, and stored in the controller for comparing against future real time signatures.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
[0040] The drawings illustrate our innovative idea of using signatures, assigned to three exemplary modes, to allow a user with sever mobility impairment to call for help, communicate needs, and operate many conventional devices through the same very small range of movement. Additionally the drawings show how the tier system supports our exemplary modes and how the tier system “decides” when a real time signature looks similar to a stored signature in order to invoke the mode assigned to that stored signature.

[0041] Further, All the figures have two axis. The horizontal axis is in time and the vertical axis is in voltage.

[0042] Further still, all the figures have the “Natural Rest Position” as a horizontal dotted line. This dotted line is the starting reference for our signatures.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
[0043] FIGURE 1 shows how our three exemplary modes signatures typically appear, relative to each other. Typically the alert signal has the largest amplitude and period, followed by the matrix grid switch signature. Finally the alignment alarm signature typically falls below the natural rest position without returning.

[0044] Additionally FIGURE 1 shows five adjustable threshold levels that can be used alone, in combination with, or without our exemplary signatures to invoke one of our three modes. FIGURE 1 shows these five threshold levels and how they are relative to each other and their respective signature.

[0045] FIGURE 2 shows a typical stored or real time alert signal signature. The drawing shows two scales. The horizontal scale is the Time and the vertical scale is the Voltage. The drawing depicts how the sensor voltage changes over time when the user moves the sensing elements relative to one another.

[0046] Additionally, Figure 2 shows the aspects of a signature. The aspects are as follows: the acceleration curve of the rising edge, the amplitude of the signature, the time spent in plateau above the alert signal threshold value, the falling edge of the signature, and the period of the signature which ends when the signature reaches the near rest position.

[0047] The controller uses these aspects to understand what the signature looks like and is compares the real time signature and its aspects with all the stored signatures, called “learned behavior signatures”, and their aspects to determine whether or not the real time signature matches one of the stored signatures. The aspects of signatures can be compared to each other on an individual, in combinations, and/or on a whole basis to determine what the real time signature looks like and what action the controller should take. When the real time signature is similar to a stored signature the controller invokes the mode assigned to that stored signature.

[0048] Further, FIGURE 2 shows four thresholds levels and their relationship relative to each other and the signature as a whole. The Thresholds can be used with a signature, in whole, in part, or without the signature to invoke one of our exemplary modes.

[0049] Further still, FIGURE 2 shows an alert signal signature is typically the tallest and longest signature of our exemplary modes.

[0050] FIGURE 3 shows examples of real time signatures (the segmented signature lines) that are similar to stored signatures. These two signatures are being compared to each other so the controller can decide if the real time signature looks like the signature it is being compared to in order to invoke our disclosed tier system.

[0051] Further, FIGURE 3 shows the lower segmented signatures are smaller in amplitude and period but the shape of both signatures is very similar to the larger stored signature. It is this similarity our tier system is monitoring for and in the upper half of FIGURE 3 our tier system would invoke the alert signal tier, in the lower half of FIGURE 3 our tier system would invoke the matrix grid switch tier.

[0052] Further still, if the tier system is configured in the manor that uses increments and an event like FIGURE 3 happens then the controller will temporarily reduce the stored signature as a whole or in part to look more like the segmented signature, essentially making that modes signature temporally easier for user to invoke on their next attempt. See FIGURE 6 for examples of how the signature can be changed.

[0053] Further still, if the tier system is configured in the manor that invokes one of our three modes assigned to a signature anytime a real time signature looks similar to a stored signature then the lower segmented signatures in FIGURE 3 will invoke the mode of their respected signatures.

[0054] FIGURE 4 shows our Matrix grid signature and how an operational window can be used along with the signature to help narrow when the matrix grid switch is invoked. FIGURE 4 also shows the aspects that make up the matrix grid switch signature. The signature clearly has an acceleration curve on the rising edge, a time within the operational window, a falling edge, and a period which ends at the returning to near natural rest position. The illustration also shows how the matrix grid switch signature is typically different in appearance from the alert signal signature.

[0055] Additionally, in the lower half of FIGURE 4 the depicted signature, failed to reach the operational window but still looks similar to the upper half signature. Since these two signatures are similar our tier system would be invoked for the matrix grid switch.

[0056] FIGURE 5 shows the aspects that our tier system is always monitoring and using in comparing stored and real time signatures to each other. FIGURE 5 also shows how the period and amplitude of a signature can be different but the signatures themselves can look similar. In FIGURE 5 the second signature looks like the first larger signature and would invoke our tier system that has been assigned to the alert signal in this example.

[0057] FIGURE 6 shows how a stored signature can be changed by the tier system. The “typical signature” in FIGURE 6 shows a general amplitude and period. In FIGURE 6 “amplitude change”, only the amplitude of the “typical signature” has been changed. Changing only the amplitude allows the user to invoke the mode assigned to that signature when they are experiencing a time of limited movement. In FIGURE 6 “period change” the “typical signature” has been changed by the tier system to shorten the period to allow for times when the user may be more alert and have better movement capabilities than when the stored signature was captured and stored. In FIGURE 6 “complete signature change” the “typical signature” amplitude and period have been reduced allowing the user to use the mode assigned to the signature in times of limited movement.

[0058] FIGURE 7 “typical signature of sensing element falling off” is a signature where one or both of the primary sensing elements have falling off of user making our system inoperable to user. FIGURE 7 “typical signature of sensing elements slipping then falling off” shows the primary sensing elements slipping out of alignment over a period of time then one or more of the primary sensing elements completely falling off user. FIGURE 7 “typical signature of sensing element falling off over a period of time” shows a signature of the primary sensing elements slipping out of alignment over a period of time. This typically happens over a period of a few days.

[0059] Additionally FIGURE 7 shows the aspects “Natural rest position”, “Alignment alarm threshold value”, “Hall sensor minimum output value” and how they are relative to each other and a signature.

[0060] FIGURE 8 shows additional signatures that would set off our alignment alarm. In FIGURE 8 “out of alignment with failed alert signal effort” the signature is such that one or both of our sensing elements have become misaligned and the user made an effort to use the alert signal and failed. The controller will be configured to invoke the alignment alarm when such a signature is produced by user. The tier system may also invoke the alert signal since it sees a signature that is similar to the stored alert signal signature.

[0061] Additionally in the “continuous out of alignment signature” of FIGURE 8 the signature is shown to be continuously out of optimal alignment posing a risk to the user of not being able to invoke the matrix grid switch mode or the alert signal mode. When the controller sees such a signature the alignment alarm is invoked.

[0062] Further, in the view “sensing elements stuck together” of FIGURE 8 the signature is such that the sensing elements have fallen off user and are stuck together or the two sensing elements are stuck very close to one another.

[0063] FIGURE 9 shows signatures that would not invoke the alignment alarm. These signatures are such that they allow the user to have typical expressive facial movements without invoking false alerts of the alignment alarm.

[0064] FIGURE 10 shows additional signatures that would trigger the alert signal. In FIGURE 10 “possible aspirating signature” the signature is such that it has a rapid acceleration curve on the rising edge and long high value plateau indicating the user is likely aspirating and is in need of assistance. Additionally FIGURE 10 shows the signature “alert and awake signal signature”. This signature is common when a user has excellent motor control response. The profile of this signature is recognized by the steep acceleration curve of the rising edge, the short plateau, the steep falling edge, and the relatively short period. Further FIGURE 10 shows the signature “failed alert signal effort with successful attempt”. This signature is recognizable by the double rise in voltage without the user first returning to the natural rest position and the second voltage rise is taller than the first.

[0065] FIGURE 11 shows two signatures that would invoke the matrix grid switch. Both signatures are such that they each reach the window of operation, stay in said window for a period of time, and then start returning to the natural rest position. Despite the two signatures being different from each other, each would invoke the matrix grid switch.

[0066] FIGURE 12 shows a possible arrangement of how the matrix grid can look using the light emitting diode configuration.

[0067] Additionally FIGURE 12 shows how the rows and columns relate to each other. The circles in the furthest column to the left with the number in the boxes is the Y-AXIS, where the circles represent an LED and that LED represents a row or X-AXIS. The ovals in each box in the rows represent an L.E.D. which in turn represent the function written in the box. As an example; the circle 1 L.E.D. represents the row or X-AXIS consisting of the TV on, TV off, TV volume up, TV volume down, TV mute, TV channel up, and TV channel down.

[0068] The operation of FIGURE 12 is as follows: The L.E.D.’s in the Y-AXIS will self scroll on and off in succession continually repeating until the matrix grid receives a signal from the controller indicating the user has invoked the matrix grid switch. Once the signal is received by the matrix grid the L.E.D. that was illuminated stays on. Now the X-AXIS, represented by that Y-AXIS L.E.D., starts to self scroll on and off in succession continually repeating until the matrix grid receives a signal from the controller indicating the user has invoked the matrix grid switch. Next, the function written in the box of the X-AXIS L.E.D. that illuminated is invoked.

[0069] The matrix grid can be configured to run the function in the box of the X-Axis L.E.D. that is illuminated as long as the L.E.D. remains illuminated, or it can be configured to reset to only the X-AXIS, or the matrix grid can be configured to reset completely starting the self scroll of the Y-AXIS.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0070] We disclose a novel use of a Hall sensor used together with a magnet as a “switch system”. Our Hall switch is used to invoke the state of one of a multitude of exemplary switch modes. Each mode is invoked based on a real time profile, or signature, the user makes using the Hall sensor and magnet system or other suitable sensor/sensors. A controller receives the signature and acts upon the switch system movement caused by the user. The controller includes methods to learn, record and store unique movements caused by the user called “learned behavior signatures”. Each learned behavior signature is assigned to its own switch mode. When the users current signature is similar to a stored learned behavior signature the controller will invoke the mode appointed to that learned behavior signature

[0071] The controller, either microprocessor based, utilizing discrete components, or a combination of thereof, is connected to the Hall Sensor and is configured to monitor the real time position of the magnet in relation to the Hall sensor. These real time movements become “signatures” that are compared to “learned behavior signatures” that are stored in the controller and it is this “signature” that is made by the user that is used to invoke either of the three disclosed exemplary switching modes defined as follows:

[0072] We disclose an “Alignment Alarm” as an alarm that is designed to detect if any of the elements of the switch system fall out of alignment such as when the switching elements have fallen off the user or if wires should become detached from the system. The Alignment Alarm is only invoked when there is an off-normal condition. The “signatures” of the Alignment Alarm are ones that detect when the switch system signal indicates the switch elements are either too close or too far away from each other, thereby making the switch system unusable by the user. In this condition the Alignment Alarm triggers the necessary alarms to alert the caregiver that attention is required to properly affix and align the Hall switch elements. Additionally the alignment alarm supports a signature that the user can use as a backup alarm by willfully moving the sensing elements out of alignment.

[0073] We disclose an “Alert Signal” as a signal designed to allow the user to alert the caregiver that the user is in need of attention. Such needs might be where the user is in need of care immediately, such as when in distress, or when user simply wants to communicate with caregiver. As such, the “signatures” for this mode are such that they support the user’s need when in distress, in need of immediate attention, or desire to communicate with caregiver. A typical signature of an alert signal consists of higher signal levels of time, amplitude, and/or frequency. Additionally our alert signal includes an innovative method to block repetitious false activations along with a feedback indicator, indicating the block is active. Further, the alert signal has a method to produce its own unique signal. Further still the alert signal uses a method to prevent sensory adaptation. Further still, the alert signal uses a method to invoked the alert signal when user fails to respond to controllers prompts.

[0074] We disclose a “Matrix Grid Switch”, as a mode the user utilizes to communicate with a computer, turn on and off appliances, , and use a matrix to select letters to spell out messages to the caregiver. The Matrix Grid Switch signatures typically show a narrower range of time, amplitude, and/or frequency that the controller can easily measure and interpret. The user is typically capable of some functional motor control enabling them to initiate reliable and controlled movements to invoke more complex switching tasks. Additionally we disclose a means for the user to receive feedback from the controller as to the state of the matrix grid switch. In one embodiment the feedback is made up of two light emitting diodes. One L.E.D is green indicating the switch is ready to be used and the other L.E.D is red indicating the switch is not ready to be used. Further, our matrix grid switch mode contains a means to prevent user from staying on the switch. In one embodiment the means to prevent user from staying on the switch is done by using a time delay initiated after user has moved the magnet back to the near rest position.

[0075] In order to compensate for a users inability to invoke a particular switching mode a “Tier System” is configured to constantly monitor and store the real time signature of the movement caused by the user. Frequently users will not be able to sustain the normal levels of movement needed to invoke any of the learned behaviors signatures. The Tier System is designed to compensate for these times and can be configure in one of two ways.

[0076] The tier system can be configured to lower or raise any switch modes learned behavior signature in discrete increments. If the user is still not able to invoke the needed signature after all increments have been attempted then the controller will invoke the alert signal.

[0077] As an example, if a user wants to invoke the Alert Signal and finds it difficult to trigger the alarm, because they cannot move the Hall switch system as far as required to trigger the Alert Signal the Tier System is configured to gather this real time history of the movements and will lower, or raise, the amplitude, time, and/or frequency levels of the “signature” trigger levels by a small percentage. If the above example happens again the signature levels are lowered by a larger percentage and so on until user is able to invoke the switch mode or user has attempted all tiers at which point the alert signal is activated by the controller.

[0078] The tier system can be configured to invoke any switch mode when the users movements create a signature alike to a learned behavior but the user was unable to reproduce the typical values of time, amplitude, and/or frequency. In this configuration the user can use the intended switch mode on the first effort and invoke the correct mode as if the user had their normal range of motion.

[0079] As an example, if a user wants to invoke the Alert Signal and finds it difficult to trigger the alarm, because they cannot move the Hall switch system as far as necessary to trigger the Alert Signal the Tier System is configured to gather this real time history of the movements and will lower, or raise, the entire “signature” trigger levels to enable the user to invoke the Alert Signal.

[0080] Additional aspects, methods, and configurations of the L.I.S.A. alarm include means that incorporate the use of the five thresholds shown in Figure 1 to invoke each of our disclosed modes and tier system. Such additional aspects, methods, and configurations are disclosed below.

[0081] An inventive feature of the disclosed device is the alignment alarm. No other known conventional devices have this feature. This feature is key to the operational efficiency and efficacy of the device. Conventional devices suffer from problems associated with movement of the sensor or user, effectively rendering the device inoperable. Since conventional systems do not provide a means to invoke an alert signal when primary sensing element/elements fall off or are out of optimum tolerance, decreasing users ability to use their systems, they can create frustration and anxiety for the patient. The disclosed system helps reduce these negative experiences by detecting if the sensor has moved out of optimum tolerance and if the sensors are out of optimum tolerance then the controller continually invokes the remote stations alarm and alert signal alarm.

[0082] We disclose the following aspect of our innovative idea, the “Alignment alarm”. The alignment alarm consist of the following elements, an interrupt switch, a means to adjust the sensitivity of the alignment alarm threshold, a full volume alert signal, a delay from activating alignment alarm, an indicator giving feedback to user and/or caregiver the moment the alignment alarm threshold has been met or surpassed, a method to keep alert alarm active until the primary sensing elements optimum tolerance is restored or interrupt switch is engaged, a means to generate a different frequency for annunciator, another element is a means to use the alignment alarm as a backup alarm, additionally another element is a means to generate a unique wireless signal to invoke remote stations until optimum tolerance is restored or interrupt switch is engaged.

[0083] An aspect of the Alignment alarm is the interrupt switch. The switch interrupts/disconnects the alignment alarm signal from invoking the annunciator and the remote stations. We disclose the need for the interrupt switch as a means for caregiver to turn off the alignment alarm while changing novel method of attachment for sensor elements. Other needs could be when patient needs to be moved to another location/reposition, bathed, or one of sensing elements has fallen off and its location is not known.

[0084] An additional disclosed aspect of the alignment alarm is the method to adjust the sensitivity of the alignment alarm. This feature allows our Inventive idea to adapt to different users. Further, being adjustable allows the alignment alarm to be more or less sensitive to accommodate users needs or facial movements in order to reduce false alerts.

[0085] We disclose a method to generate a full volume alarm which cannot be reduced in volume. This is a safety feature to ensure no human error can render the alert signal ineffective.

[0086] We disclose the delay aspect of the alignment alarm. The delay is necessary to reduce false alignment alarm events by delaying the alarm which in turn allows the user some movements outside of the primary sensor optimum tolerance, but still invokes alarms in the event the optimum tolerance is lost for too long a time.

[0087] We disclose the aspect of a feedback indicator. In one embodiment the indicator can be an LED that changes states between on and off. Any time the alignment alarm threshold is triggered the LED state changes from off to on immediately. This aid can be used as a failsafe indicator in the event the interrupt switch has been left in the disable position, the visual aid can also be used as quick reference in setting the alignment alarm, or if the tolerance between primary sensor elements is to restricted. In such an example the LED will change states between on and off frequently.

[0088] We disclose a method to invoke the alignment alarms unique signal continuously until the interrupt switch is engaged or until the optimum tolerance in the primary sensor elements is restored. The alignment alarm signal will be invoked in the controller and remote stations.

[0089] We disclose a method for the alignment alarm to have its own unique signal so that it can be easily distinguished from our other disclosed alarm signal sounds. Having different alarm sounds, for our different modes, allows the caretaker to understand why and what alarm is going off.

[0090] One exemplary method for the alignment alarm is to use it as a failsafe backup alert signal for the user. The user can deliberately move the Hall switch out of tolerance until the alignment alarm is invoked.

[0091] Another element of the alignment alarm is a unique signal generated to invoke any of the remote stations either through a wired or wireless system.

[0092] In one Embodiment of the disclosed inventive idea the alignment alarm is configured as follows. The alignment alarm can be the lowest manually set threshold as seem in FIGURE 1 and invokes the alignment alarm signal when the Hall switch elements loose optimum tolerance invoking the full volume annunciator through controller and remote stations until the interrupt switch is enabled or the optimum tolerance is restored to sensing elements.

[0093] In one exemplary use for the alignment alarm the two elements making up the Hall switch are moved out of optimum tolerance. This change in tolerance will invoke the alignment alarm, a maximum audible alert sent through the controller and remote stations but at a different frequency as to distinguish between a normal alert signal.

[0094] In an alternative embodiment of the alignment alarm the threshold is set through artificial intelligence.

[0095] Additionally a means to display and compare the Hall switch signal to the alignment alarm threshold value in real time is included.

[0096] When only using the alert signal threshold an alternative embodiment of the alert signal includes methods to deactivate all modes with lower amplitudes when user is trying to use the alert signal. In one embodiment to disable the matrix grid, which typically has a lower threshold value, we use a combination of a timing delay and window comparator to delay this modes activation which allows user time to pass through said modes operational window without activating the matrix grid switch mode. It is this combination that allows the user to activate the alert signal without invoking the matrix grid or any other modes.

[0097] In an alternative embodiment of the alert signal we disclose an inventive means to prevent the alert switch from “staying” activated utilizing an innovative delay or blocking function to prevent the user from constantly triggering the alert signal. The alert trigger is disabled by an AND circuit that includes a timing circuit that can be controlled by discrete electronics or microprocessor and a returning to near rest position circuit. When the AND circuit is enabled the trigger is effectively disconnected from user but stabilized to prevent the trigger from floating causing an accidental invoking of alert signal. Another disclosed innovative idea is to have the block time adjustable to meet the needs of different users and circumstances. The block time will range from a minimum time to a maximum time. To long of a timing cycle has been found to induce anxiety.

[0098] Conventional methods are not able to distinguish between staring at the ceiling and trying to call for help. Generally, the difference between an intentional alert and staring at the ceiling is a very small amount of movement. Users who willfully move to use the alert signal move the primary sensor elements closer to each other than when staring at the ceiling. This difference can be as little as 0.001 volts but the innovative use of the primary sensing elements is able to discern this small difference. False alerts are reduced when the alert signal threshold is set at the maximum voltage generated by user moving sensor elements as close as user can. The maximum value can be missed so a latch or hold system is used. Then simply adjusting the alert signal threshold to “LATCHED value” reduces false alarms. As such, false alerts are reduced or eliminated by having the alert signal threshold set further out than any other activity user might do.

[0099] In additional alternative embodiment, a means to easily display and compare the Hall switch signal to the alert signal threshold value in real time is included.

[0100] Also, a means to disable the strobe aspect of the alert signal when the fail safe mode is invoked. This allows the fail safe mode to have a maximum operational time.

[0101] Further, a means to disable the strobe aspect of the alert signal by means of an interrupt switch. For use in public places like a movie theater.

[0102] Further still, a means to adjust the alert signal threshold.

[0103] Further still, a means to reset the tier system after the alert signal has been invoked.

[0104] In an alternative embodiment of our innovative idea the Tier system is invoked by an exemplary three input AND gate. The three inputs consist of an adjustable timing circuit, and the returning to near rest position used twice. The first time user passes the threshold a signal is latched to one of the three input AND gate, once user passes the returning to near rest position threshold again a signal is latched to one of the three input AND gate, finally once the timing circuit is complete a signal is sent to the last third input of the AND gate activating the tier system one level. If the user only had the timing feature then every time the timing cycle expired the alert signal threshold would be reduced. Using the same philosophy it can be seen that if only four tiers were being used then after four reductions the alert signal would trigger effectively invoking a false alarm.

[0105] Additionally in our alternative embodiment the tier system can be configured to reduce the alert signal threshold by 5% the first time the tier is invoked. If the user is still unable to use the alert signal and returns to near rest position a chime will sound after all three inputs of the AND gate are receiving a signal, indicating to the user they can try again. On the second lift the alarm can be reduced an additional 3%. This process continues until all available tier levels have been used at which point the controller sets off the alert signal automatically. When the controller is configure in this manor we include a means for the tier system to automatically reset after a time period has expired. This timing cycle allows for accidental tier activations while still reducing false alerts. As an example the tier system has been activated by the user on accident, they do not need help, they yawned or something, then in about two minutes the tier reset will reset the whole tier system and return the alarm threshold trigger point to the original set number.

[0106] Additionally our Tier system employs a means to provide feedback to user as to which real time tier lever is engaged. In one embodiment LED’s are used to indicate to user what tier level is currently active. An alternative embodiment would be an LCD screen indicating what tier level is active. Further, an alternative embodiment would be an annunciator speaking aloud the active tier level.

[0107] Additionally, a means to display and compare the Hall switch signal to the near rest position threshold value in real time is included.

[0108] Further, means to invoke a feedback indicator letting the user know the tier system has been engaged one level. In one embodiment the indicator can be a ding or chirp.

[0109] Further still, a means to adjust the amount of tiers available to user

[0110] Further still, a method to invoke the alert signal after user has used all available tiers and the alert signal has not been invoked.

[0111] Further still, a means to have a loud and low chime announced when tier has been invoked based on ambient light and/or time of day.

[0112] Further still, a means to adjust the percentage drop each tier level will have on the alert signal threshold.

[0113] All ALS patient die. About 85% die within five years of being diagnosed. I think the L.I.S.A. alarm can change all this because it will give people hope, independence and the ability to call for assistance when they need it. But a really great method to attach a sensor is needed.

[0114] In our disclosed inventive idea a means is provided for attachment of primary sensor elements. Sensor stability is the foundation of successful sensor use. Conventional methods of sensor placement lead to the inevitable result of system failure. New, improved and innovative methods are needed to ensure continual and reliable use of apparati for their users. Additionally a method for sensor removal and skin health must be retained.

[0115] The best way I can think of to attach sensor/sensors to a user is a molecular bonding of DNA to users skin, so the body does not reject the attachment and thinks it is just part of the body. I do not know of any way of doing this so here is a close alternative.

[0116] I think one of two ways will be a really great way to attach sensors to users body. Since the ability to have independence and call for assistance far out ways the way a person looks, I think most if not all ALS patients would be willing to have a skin graph. Where the graft will grow or infuse around our anchor plate and then attach the graft to user location site and allow graft to grow into the selected location. The other possibility is a mesh containing users cells which are grown and then implanted to location of sensor placement. The mesh may have a piece of ceramic or other material where the Van der Waals force can be used. So the mesh will contain a very smooth flat piece of material the sensor can join with forming a very secure attachment.

[0117] Additionally we disclose a material that takes advantages of the electrostatic forces. The sensor housing would be made of a material responsible for creating one part of the electrostatic force and the anchor plate would be made of a material responsible for the opposite force. Together the two forces will create a very strong attracting force keeping the sensor secured to the anchor plate. The anchor plate is integrated to the user in the above two examples of the graph or mesh. These two system still allow the sensor housing to be removed for any reason. In the mesh method the anchor plate can be very close to natural skin level and anchor plate can be a material that is same color as user skin giving an illusion there is nothing unusual to patient.

[0118] In one Exemplary embodiment we grow an organ culture, users skin cells, to grow skin around an “anchor plate”. Then allow culture to grow into user attachment location. The anchor plate will be very smooth, a material that is inert with human body chemistry, color of user skin, very close to surface of user natural skin level, and uses one of two principles to attach sensing elements. We disclose the two principles to be the Van der Waals force, and the Electrostatic force. An example of Van der Waals force occurs when two highly refined and high precision flat materials are placed together causing a type of adhesion. An example of electrostatic force is when you peel a reusable stick decal off a piece of glass and apply to a different location and it adheres as if it was brand new.

[0119] An additional disclosed invasive method consists of an anchor implant at a user chosen attachment site. The implant can have a magnetic effect on sensor base allowing the entire implant to be below the skin, or just the attachment site of anchor could stick above skin allowing for the Electrostatic force method, or Van der Waals force principle to be used.

[0120] Additionally, we disclose non invasive methods to attach primary sensors or sensors to user.

[0121] In one disclosed embodiment the sensor or sensors can be placed or removed easily. Our disclosed innovative idea also allows for a secure, rigid and reliable attachment allowing for precision tolerances for many types of sensors to be used. Additionally the attachment method does not damage the users skin.

[0122] In one configuration of the disclosed Hall switch system, one of the sensor elements, the Hall sensor, can be attached to a stationary location on the body, such as off center from the forehead, and the other sensor element, the magnet, can be attached to the moving part of the body, such as the skin just above the eyebrow. This creative approach eliminates any wires attached to the moving part of the innovative system that is attached to user. Our disclosed sensor elements allow for lighter, more freely moving, less intrusive attachments that stays adhered to the skin longer without needing to be realigned , reset, or reattached.

[0123] Additionally, some exemplary disclose non invasive methods to attach primary sensors or sensors to user are as follows.

[0124] 1. Clean attachment area with alcohol wipe.


[0125] 2. Cut out pieces of Tegaderm™, one for above users eyebrow and the other for just below the hairline. The piece at the hairline, for an adult, may utilize dimensions around, 3/4" long and 1/2" tall. The eyebrow piece adheres better if cut a little shorter and has a curve that is similar to the eyebrow shape of user. After the Tegaderm™ is cut and in place, we cut off a piece of 3M™ low profile Dual Lock Velcro™ . The cut Velcro piece is from a 1" wide Velcro strip and is about 1/2" long. ( having the base of the Velcro thinner would allow the Velcro to form to the bodies curves better)

[0126] 3. Cut the 1" x 1/2" velcro piece into two separate pieces. One around 5/8” and the other around 3/8”. The Hairline/forehead piece is ideal if it is around 5/8" long, so the eyebrow piece will be the 3/8” piece. Now place Velcro pieces onto Tegaderm™ and apply pressure until full adhesion is complete. To finish push sensor housing onto velcro making sure full contact is accomplished. The same is done with magnet housing piece.

[0127] OR

[0128] 3. Cut out a medical tape such as Medipore™ tape by 3M™ into two small pieces, one piece will be placed above the eyebrow, the other just below the hairline. The piece at the hairline, for an adult, may utilize dimensions around, 3/4" long and 1/2" tall. The eyebrow piece adheres better if cut a little shorter and has a curve that is similar to the eyebrow shape of user. After the Medipore™ tape is cut and in place, we cut off a piece of 3M™ low profile Dual Lock Velcro™ . The cut velcro piece is from a 1" wide Velcro strip and is about 1/2" long. ( having the base of the Velcro thinner would allow the Velcro to form to the bodies curves better)

[0129] 4. Cut the 1" x 1/2" velcro piece into two separate pieces. One around 5/8” and the other around 3/8”. The Hairline/forehead piece is ideal if it is around 5/8" long, so the eyebrow piece will be the 3/8” piece.

[0130] The preparer can choose either to use a prep pad or a type of skin glue, such as costume or ostomy glue.

[0131] Some users experience better results using the prep pads while others get better results using the ostomy glue. The prep pads are less messy and easier to apply. Use a cotton swab to apply ostomy glue.

[0132] Apply enough glue to cover the skin where the tape will be placed, then place the tape directly on top of the glue. Next apply pressure to make sure the tape forces some of the glue out past the edges and into the pours of the tape. Next place the velcro pieces on the tape, finally push the sensor housing onto the Velcro until it fully seats.

[0133] The same exemplary method will be used with the magnet above the eyebrow. The Hall switch system is now ready for use.

[0134] In one exemplary use with the velcro system, the caregiver has a different option for adjusting the ease at which user can use our matrix grid switch or alert signal modes. Simply pulling off the sensor housing and placing it in a different angle or distance will change how difficult the alarm is to trigger.

[0135] In an additional exemplary use the sensor and attaching methods do not interfere with the body’s natural movement. The skin is allowed to fold and stretch as needed.

[0136] In another additional exemplary use the attachment will release from skin or velcro in the event wires or other elements of sensor are pulled on without injuring user.

[0137] In a further exemplary use the attachment method is very secure, safe and allows the patient to be moved without taking any parts off.

[0138] At times a wireless method is beneficial for Hall sensor to communicate with controller. Such a system would be most beneficial during traveling periods, such as going to doctor visits

[0139] The wireless Hall sensor system can consist of a housing for electronics, battery or super capacitor compartment, low power indicator as an aspect of a failsafe system, an alarm from the controller when power or wireless connection fails as another aspect of a failsafe system, and a method to attach to users clothes, hair, or body.

[0140] We disclose our matrix grid as a method for a user to control a computer, television, climate controls, spell out words for a third party, or control other household conventional devices like lights and a cable box. The matrix grid can be controlled by a microprocessor, discrete components, or a combination of thereof.

[0141] In one embodiment the matrix grid is made up of LED lights organized in a column and rows. Each LED in the column represents a row. The column is called the Y-AXIS and the rows are called the X-AXIS. Both axis’ are adjustably self scrolling repeatedly lighting one LED in succession after the other. As an example to the operation of the matrix grid the Y-axis will self scroll until user invokes the matrix grid switch at which time the X-axis will start to self scroll until user invokes the matrix grid switch again. The function assigned to that row and that LED is now invoked. Depending on the function invoked the entire matrix grid can reset starting the Y-axis self scrolling again or just the row can be reset allowing the user to continue using the functions assigned to that row.

[0142] In an alternative embodiment the matrix grid is made up from a L.C.D. or L.E.D. display instead of the LED lights. The displays function in a similar manner as the LCD lights above but have an additional means to store letters on the screen/display when spelling out words, or sentences. Additionally this version of the matrix grid also contains a word suggest aspect to help user speed up the spelling process.

[0143] In an additional alternative embodiment the matrix grid functions the same as the L.C.D. display but in addition the display is projected onto a surface allowing the least intrusive obstacle to user field of vision.

[0144] We disclose a means for the matrix grid to communicate with controller through the means of a wired or wireless system.

Here are the drawings:
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Thu May 28, 2015 3:21 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on January 28th, 2014, 02:44 AM by ElectronsRfun

Here are some pictures of the device I mailed to an ALS association in Alabama. They gave it to a family who has a loved one in a very similar state as my wife. Here name is Joan.

The alarm system below is an older style and works on discrete components only. The system also does not contain the matrix grid switch or the Tier system.

Picture one is the project box enclosure. The labels in red basically state the functions of the part they are near.
Image

The second picture is of the remote alert station. I blinks in patterns using 4017's and beeps. This is before I saw Chris's video on shift resisters 74HC195 and 74HC595. Both of which I have now and have to learn how to use them with the propeller. The 74HC195 I will use for the Emic2 project to get Lisa to say predetermined lines. I will use the 74HC195 to give me 32 input selections. So I hope to get Lisa to say 32 different statements that she can select from the Matrix grid.Image

Picture 3 is basically the Hall sensor set up location and use. Not much has changed here since I've been using the Hall sensor set up. I use to use two contacts made from our son's Lego sets that would ground pin2 on the 555 starting the alarm sequence. I abandoned that idea in favor of the Hall Sensor for a lot of reasons, 2 of which are the alignment alarm and the favorable benefit of having no wires attached to the only moving part of the LISA Alarm.
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Thu May 28, 2015 3:24 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 25th, 2014, 01:29 AM by ElectronsRfun

Had a good night with Lisa using the Force trainer. She was able to go through 2 full levels floating the ball between levels 1-3 with limited trouble. I was also able to get the Emic2 talking to Lisa for audio feedback. I plug a set of computer speakers into the 3.5mm jack on the Emic2 for audio, that works great.

Lisa let out a smile the first time she heard the Emic2 talking. That was great to see. For her alarm the Emic2 only says 4 things, but those four things make a huge difference to us both. Lisa prefers different voices depending on the statement being said, but I have found that perfect Paul is the best sounding voice over all. Lisa likes the female voice 8 for a couple of things though, I think the voice is Wendy.

One of the greatest changes to the LISA system with the Emic2 up and working is, I no longer have to listen too, or for, the beeping anymore. I tell you the truth, I hear the beep in my head all the time and I find myself asking, is the alarm going off? Now it's Wendy's voice saying:" Jason I need some help. Can you help me please." this is what I envision Lisa saying in real life if she could talk. So the Emic2 is slowly giving her back a voice.

Some of the other statements let her know when the tier has been initiated, and when the matrix grid switch is locked, held, and ready to be used.

Jason

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Savage///Circuits » Thu May 28, 2015 3:28 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 25th, 2014, 12:13 PM by Chris Savage

I'm glad to see you got the Emic 2 stuff worked out. I haven't yet had a free moment to set one up and try any of the things you mentioned before. :(
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Thu May 28, 2015 3:44 pm

Originally post on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 27th, 2014, 05:41 PM by ElectronsRfun

Odd circuits and the beginners that build them, like me

Okay, I was having trouble with the Emic2 needing a time delay. Once the Emic2 is invoked the device seems to need about a 4 second delay before a new statement can be read and spoken.

On Lisa's alarm sometimes when the Tier is lowered the new alert signal is lower than the Hall sensor value activating the alert signal. Well this is good but I have the Emic2 already speaking the tier reduction message, but the code also tells the Emic2 to speak the alert signal message as well. What ends up happening is the alert signal message is not spoken. This is not good.

I did not have any pins to work off of, so I had to use the pin I use for the strobe light. The problem with this pin is it is pulsed and it sen ds the pulse when the alert signal is invoked. I tapped into this pin and changed the signal to something I needed. I have no idea if what I did is ok or "acceptability electronics" etiquette but it works and I thought those with a lot more experience could look at it and shake their heads with a little laugh.

The diode is used so the, what I call my "battery, or storage", capacitor doesn't stop the strobe from flashing. Then the "battery" capacitor I use as a 3.0 volt (germanium diode) supply source. Then I feed that through a RC circuit that delays the on signal until the voltage gets to about 1.65 volts. Once the voltage reaches 1.65 volts then the Emic2 speaks the alert signal message.

Imagejust noticed the picture is missing the resistor that allows both capacitors to drain off. That resistor is located after the diode and is a large value that connects to GND.

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Savage///Circuits » Thu May 28, 2015 3:46 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 27th, 2014, 11:52 PM by Chris Savage

Jason,

There's something wrong here...I can't believe the Emic 2 would need 4 seconds between commands. I'm more inclined to think there's something else going on. So tomorrow I am going to find my Emic and test this theory. You should haven't to kludge things like that in order to get this to work. Once I find my Emic 2 tomorrow I will have a look at the code examples (that's right, I've not yet used an Emic 2, GASP) and see what can be done to fix this without the messy work-around. :oops:
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Thu May 28, 2015 3:54 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 28th, 2014, 12:11 AM by ElectronsRfun

Chris,

You don't have to check the Emic. It is working, despite my funny fix. I know you are over worked right now. My intentions were to make fun of myself and get others to laugh at the crazy fix I made. And to simply submit a part of my project that I was having trouble with.

Here is the code I am using to make the Emic2 work with the Lisa alarm code. In the event you want to look anyway. I don't know if it will help but I thought it might. I misspelled some words on purpose in the DAT section because the Emic says it better that way.

Code: Select all

CON
  _clkmode = xtal1 + pll16x
  _xinfreq = 5_000_000


  EMIC_TX        = 20           ' Serial output (connects to Emic 2 SIN)
  EMIC_RX        = 21         ' Serial input (connects to Emic 2 SOUT)
 
VAR


   Byte   cogEmic_2


  Long   Stack[20]   'stack was 200
     
OBJ
 
  Emic2    : "FullDuplexSerial"                           ' Full Duplex Serial




PUB StartEmic_2: success


 
  StopEmic_2
  success := (cogEmic_2 := cognew(main, @stack[0]) + 1) 'stack was 100
 


PUB StopEmic_2




  if cogEmic_2
    cogstop(cogEmic_2~ - 1)
       
 
PUB main


' Set-up serial port for communication with the Emic 2
  Emic2.Start(EMIC_RX, EMIC_TX, %0000, 9_600)          ' Start serial port, normal mode, 9600bps
 
 {{
   When the Emic 2 powers on, it takes about 3 seconds for it to successfully
   intialize. It then sends a ":" character to indicate it's ready to accept
   commands. If the Emic 2 is already initialized, a CR will also cause it
   to send a ":"             
 }}
 
  Emic2.TX(13)                                     ' Send a CR in case the system is already up
  repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"                    ' When the Emic 2 has initialized and is ready, it will send a single ':' character, so wait here until we receive it
     
  waitcnt(clkfreq / 100 + cnt)                          ' Delay 10mS
  Emic2.RxFlush
  Emic2.Str(String("N8",13))    'wendy's voice
  Emic2.Str(String("V18",13))   'volume


 
  repeat


    If ina[22]      'The sensor is out of Alignment. Please check sensor Alignment


      Emic2.Str(String("N0",13))    'perfect paul's voice
      Emic2.Str(String("V8",13))   'volume
      Emic2.TX("S")                                 
      Emic2.Str(@LisaString0)                               
      Emic2.TX(13)                          ' Send the desired string to convert to speech (stored in the DAT section below)
      repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"     ' Wait here until the Emic 2 responds with a ":" indicating it's ready to accept the next command
        Emic2.TX(13)


     waitcnt(clkfreq * 4 + cnt)


    If ina[23]      'Maytrix switch is ready
     
      Emic2.Str(String("N0",13))    'perfect paul's voice
      Emic2.Str(String("V8",13))   'volume
      Emic2.TX("S")                                 
      Emic2.Str(@LisaString1)                           
      Emic2.TX(13)
      repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"                   
        Emic2.TX(13)
   
     waitcnt(clkfreq * 4 + cnt) 'changed from 4-9


    If ina[3]        'Tier three. alert signal reduced 12 percent
     
        Emic2.Str(String("V8",13))   'volume
        Emic2.Str(String("N8",13))    'wendy's voice
        Emic2.TX("S")                                 
        Emic2.Str(@LisaString7)                             
        Emic2.TX(13)
       repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"                   
         Emic2.TX(13)
   
       waitcnt(clkfreq*3 + cnt)
     
    If ina[24]        'Tier Two. alert signal reduced
     
        Emic2.Str(String("V8",13))   'volume
        Emic2.Str(String("N8",13))    'wendy's voice
        Emic2.TX("S")                                 
        Emic2.Str(@LisaString6)                             
        Emic2.TX(13)
       repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"                   
         Emic2.TX(13)
   
       waitcnt(clkfreq*3 + cnt)
     
    If ina[25]        'tier one activated
     
        Emic2.Str(String("V8",13))   'volume
        Emic2.Str(String("N8",13))    'wendy's voice
        Emic2.TX("S")                                 
        Emic2.Str(@LisaString3)                             
        Emic2.TX(13)
       repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"                   
         Emic2.TX(13)
   
       waitcnt(clkfreq*3 + cnt)


    If ina[27]         'Jayson. I might need some help. or. I wan't to say something. Can you please come over here.


       
      Emic2.Str(String("V12",13))   'volume
      Emic2.Str(String("N8",13))    'wendy's voice
      Emic2.TX("S")                                 
      Emic2.Str(@LisaString2)                           
      Emic2.TX(13)
      repeat until Emic2.RxCheck == ":"                   
           Emic2.TX(13)
       repeat until ina[27] == 0     
      waitcnt(clkfreq*4 + cnt)                                                   


 
 
DAT
'InitHeader    byte "Emic 2 Text-to-Speech Module Demonstration", pst#NL, pst#NL, 0
'TextString    byte "Hello. My name is the Emic 2 Text-to-Speech module. I would like to sing you a song.", 0
LisaString0   byte "The sensor is out of Alignment. Please check sensor Alignment", 0
LisaString1   byte "Maytrix switch is ready", 0
LisaString2   byte "Jayson. I might need some help. ore. I wan't to say something. Can you please come over here.", 0
LisaString3   byte "Tier one activated", 0
LisaString4   byte "Matrix switch window is on", 0
LisaString5   byte "Alert signal activated", 0
LisaString6   byte "Tier Two. alert signal reduced", 0
LisaString7   byte "Tier Three. alert signal lower by 12 percent", 0

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Savage///Circuits » Thu May 28, 2015 4:04 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 28th, 2014, 01:34 PM by Chris Savage

I guess my thought is that if it isn't doing what it should be then finding the root cause would be a better option since ideally you said you'd want to make these units available to others some day. If there are issues that require work-arounds it doesn't say much good about the components used. ;) So it is in our best interest to make sure customers using these products don't have to come up with strange and interesting ways to get the product to work as it should normally.
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Savage///Circuits » Thu May 28, 2015 4:06 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 28th, 2014, 02:53 PM by Chris Savage

By the way, I found my Emic 2. So at some point today I will be at least running and experimenting with the test code so I can familiarize myself with the product more. This way I will be in a better position to answer questions and identify issues.
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Thu May 28, 2015 4:09 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on February 28th, 2014, 03:22 PM by ElectronsRfun

Hi Chris,

I'm at my son's high school right now on the phone. Can you hook up the speaker to your Emic2 to see if you can hear any sound. Eventually I am going need a amplifier circuit in addition to the one on the Emic.

I would like to solve the Emic2 delay I'm having not only for the reasons you mentioned but also because doing so will make me a better programmer.

Thanks for the info on the formula. I will study it and write it down in the back of my book.


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