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Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Granz » Sat May 30, 2015 8:31 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 7th, 2014, 02:08 PM by Granz

Yes, I think that VGA would be the way to go - you could even use different colored words, or dots, to keep with your original idea for Lisa to discern colors better than letters.

Now, for my idea about making the discrete LEDs easier:

Consider the matrix. Start off with a simple XY matrix with wires running horizontal (for the X axis) and more wires running vertical (for the Y axis.) Now, at each junction, connect an LED with all of the cathodes (the negative side of the LED) connected to the Y axis wires, and the anodes connected to the X axis wires. (And, since a picture is worth a thousand words...)
Image

Next, we will put some signals (positive and negative) onto these wires. Start off with all of the Y-axis wires tied to high and all the X-axis wires tied to low (ground) like this:
Image

Since current flows from low (negative) to high (positive) (remember, the only thing moving in an electrical circuit is electrons, which have a negative charge, they are attracted to a positive charge - "opposites attract") and since current can only flow through a diode (including LEDs) from cathode to anode (against the direction of the arrow in the schematic symbol) then no LEDs will be lit - in this example.

Now, if we want to turn on one of the LEDs, we would simply reverse the charges on the X- and the Y-axis for the specific LED that we want to light.
Image

Notice, in the above picture, how the second wire from the top has been changed to high, and the second wire from the left has been changed to low. The electrons (current) will flow from the "low" point, at the bottom of the picture, up the wire, and then will be attracted to the "high" on the other side of the diode. Since all of the other diodes have a low on their anode, the current will not be attracted to anything and will not flow through any other diodes. Since the current can flow through the diode in this direction, it will flow through and off to the high point on the left side of the picture. This idea may be expanded, pretty much, indefinitely; to give a matrix as large as you need.

Ok, now that we have a matrix, where you can select an individual LED to turn on (and thus back off, too,) we need to be able to control the LEDs with a simple output port from a microcontroller (or computer.) Consider the lowly 74LS154 - this is a 4-bit binary decoder (or sometimes called a 4-line to 16-line decoder.) You input a 4-bit binary number on the input lines, and one of the 16 output lines (the one corresponding to the binary number that was input) goes low. Since you prefer the CMOS 4000 series, you may also use one of the CMOS variants of this '154 chip (i.e.: 74C154, 74HC154, 74HCT154, etc.,) check the data sheets for specifics.
Image

Now, if you expand the matrix out to 10X10 (100 LEDs, like in your L.I.S.A. panel) and take the outputs from the '154 and run them to the bottom of the matrix you will have a ready made circuit for half of your display (remember that each output is high unless selected by the number which you input,) the Y-axis lines. The X-axis is only slightly more complicated: each output line of the '154 is high unless selected - we need just the opposite: we need active high, and low if not selected. Enter the inverter:
Click image for larger version. Name: Inverter.jpeg Views: 44 Size: 1.7 KB ID: 1519

Whatever is input to this gate is inverted (hence the name.) In other words, if you input a high, then the gate outputs a low, and vice-a-verse. Take each output from the X-axis '154 and run it through an inverter and you have the left-side inputs to the matrix. The 74LS04 (or CMOS 74C04) chip has six of these inverters on each chip. Thus, two of the '154s and three of the '04s (for a total of 5 chips) will give you the drive needed for your 10X10 matrix. Also, since the '154 has chip select inputs, you could expand the display to 16X16 (or 256 LEDs) by not selecting the chips when you want all of the LEDs turned off.

With two 4-bit output ports, one going to each '154 you can control each individual LED in a 10X10 matrix by using numbers of 10 (1010b) or higher for the inputs (off the matrix) to turn all LEDs off, and then outputing the specific X- and Y-axis numbers to turn a LED on. If you repeatedly output two or three (or more) sets of numbers, you can fool the eye into believing that multiple LEDs are on at the same time. This is how a television works (at least the old CRT types, I'm not too sure that all of the newer ones work the same) only one pixel is on at any given time, the screen is "refreshed" (redrawn) fast enough that your eyes believe that the picture is totally present.

You will need to be careful about the current that you draw through the LEDs. If you put a 220 ohm (could be up to 470 ohm, pretty loose requirements) resistor on each X-axis line, between the matrix and the inverters, that should take care of most LED requirements (with a +5V supply.)

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Sat May 30, 2015 8:37 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 7th, 2014, 05:03 PM by ElectronsRfun

This is kinda like one of the Christmas trees I built the blue led one.

here is video of Christmas tree
https://youtu.be/HVHZUcoLCBA
(Note: as of May 30, 2015, the above video does not exist)

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Sat May 30, 2015 8:46 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 7th, 2014, 11:23 PM by ElectronsRfun

ART and Chris,

First off let me say thanks for trying to encourage me to do the display on a TV or monitor or such. Here is a picture of the little TV I got from Parallax to specifically do that job. Of course its a little on the small side but I was thinking it could be used for travel purposes and at home we could use the bigger screen. Of course it is also small enough to fit under the matrix grid and run concurrent with the matrix grid. But I think on a big TV is really cool and will force me to learn something I want to learn anyway. Besides Chris has scared me enough not to build my 6 arm Elev-8 because I don't want to crash it. I even saw Jessica crash hers on her first time. So maybe I'll just stick with the display for now.
Image


Art,

Thanks for introducing me to those IC's. They sound a lot like the 74HC595 8 bit shift registers. I have about 10 of those here at home. after reading through your post I illuminating an LED with just a few chips seems easy but the grid has to be self scrolling and I'm not real clear on how your system would confirm a selection from Lisa based on the current LED that is illuminated. Did I miss something.

With my current system I use AND gates to illuminate the correct LED based on row and column and that AND gate feed into the hex inverter chips (that sinks the correct LED )and another AND gate that is looking for the confirmation signal from Lisa. That way if Lisa can't confirm at the right time the row will just continue to scroll until Lisa confirms the exit LED. This method allows her to skip the correct LED and not get frustrated by missing the whole correct row..

Can you point me in the direction of your system where I can learn how Lisa confirmation could do the same as the one I built.

Here is the basic layout of the matrix grid for just one LED but the rest are just the same over and over again.
Image

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Savage///Circuits » Sat May 30, 2015 8:49 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 8th, 2014, 11:20 AM by Chris Savage

To be accurate, my encouragement is to do things however you feel are best/most appropriate. I simply did not want you to discount the VGA stuff due to no experience since there are ample examples. To be honest I have only used the VGA output one time and I hijacked someone else's object and tailored it to my own use. That said, if I had an application that could benefit from using VGA output I would certainly be checking out more of the examples than I have previously. And, as always, if you need help and I can, I will help you.
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Sat May 30, 2015 8:54 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 9th, 2014, 07:14 AM by ElectronsRfun

Matrix Grid video is up on You Tube.
https://youtu.be/n4JOXw9qWko
(Note: as of May 30, 2015, the above video does not exist)

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Sat May 30, 2015 10:17 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 10th, 2014, 05:54 AM by ElectronsRfun

I know you and Art said VGA but I used the composite video for the yellow RCA jack to display on the TV. I don't know if one is easier to use over the other but I don't think the TV has enough lines to display the whole Matrix Grid. Plus I don't really understand the demo nor how to make it scroll. Maybe something like repeat i from 0 to 10 and then change the colors as it scrolls through i or something. Yeah... don't think I'm ready to mess with this stuff yet. A lot of the program is written in PASM anyway.

This is all I could figure out. And was enough to tell me the entirety of the grid messages won't even come close to fitting on the TV display. As I thought about how the user might view the grid, it seems to me, the best display would be one were the user could see the entire grid messages, with the current one highlighted or blinking or some other method to indicate were the grid is at so the user can see were the grid is at and were the user needs to go to get the grid to were they want it.

So if the grid only display row 1, or only a portion of the grid, and the user wanted something in row 10, but didn't know that item was in ten, the user would have more induced anxiety and probably would not be prepared to use the selection device once row 10 showed up.

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Savage///Circuits » Sat May 30, 2015 10:20 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 10th, 2014, 08:58 AM by Chris Savage

Hmmm, well, you could take the more complex approach and "scroll" options by for each row or you could try one more thing. I believe there is another text object that is very tiny but can display more text. Found it, it is called, "VGA_HiRes_Text_Demo.spin". Well, that is the demo object. This is for VGA but displayed substantially more rows and columns than the NTSC output. Not sure if the display you're using has a VGA input or not. But I did write a program for someone who needed a lot of text on the display and so this is what I used.

In the end it may be that what you're doing already is the better solution. I am merely here to offer alternate selections and help if I can with anything that I have knowledge of. My suggestions are in no way an indication that your existing method is flawed in any way. In fact, mine may be the less useful as you'd be tying up a display that could be providing other stimulus such as movies or TV.
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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Sat May 30, 2015 10:22 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on August 10th, 2014, 05:37 PM by ElectronsRfun

Okay Chris, I'll look at that. Thanks for the suggestions.

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Electrons-R-Fun » Sat May 30, 2015 10:28 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on May 26th, 2015, 01:54 PM by ElectronsRfun

Well.... I have finally gotten Lisa's alarm to call my cell phone after she has set off the alarm 3 times, and If she sets it off 5 times a 110 dB alarm goes off at 2 second intervals every 10 seconds for a period of 3 minuets. I currently also have a counter keeping track of how many times Lisa has set off the alarm so she knows how close she is to calling me or the siren being set off.

This update is one of the last things I wanted the alarm to do.... I wonder if I will ever improve it more? .... Yeah, probably

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Re: Linear Integratable Signal Assistant (L.I.S.A.) Alarm

Postby Granz » Sat May 30, 2015 10:30 pm

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums on May 27th, 2015, 05:23 AM by Granz

Originally Posted by ElectronsRfun
...I currently also have a counter keeping track of how many times Lisa has set off the alarm so she knows how close she is to calling me or the siren being set off.

This update is one of the last things I wanted the alarm to do.... I wonder if I will ever improve it more? .... Yeah, probably
...


Does Lisa have a way to cancel the call/alarm, or to lower the count? If not, that may be a good improvement. She may want/need to do that, in case she makes a mistake, or her situation changes and she does not need your assistance any more.
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