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The Tiny2313 Experimenter System (Completed)

This is the place to talk about Atmel AVR Microcontrollers, including the ATtiny & ATmega series.
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The Tiny2313 Experimenter System (Completed)

Postby Granz » Sat May 23, 2015 11:55 am

Originally posted on the Savage///Circuits Forums
December 11th, 2014, 02:56 PM
by Granz


I wanted to let everyone know about this project. It was a long time in coming, but I think that it turned out pretty well.

This is a development kit and book designed to answer the question: "how do I get started in microcontrollers?"

The book is written in an easy to follow format, and takes the reader from learning just what, exactly, a microcontroller is, through to building the development kit, connecting circuits and writing programs for the thing.

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You can see more about the development process, and expansion of the development kit, in a couple of my blog posts: http://projects.granzeier.com/category/development-systems/2313-experimenter-system/
Materials needed:
You will need a few parts for this project. You can get most of these from your local Radio Shack, or you may mail order them from any of many different supply houses.

  1. a breadboard - you will need at least an 800-terminal breadboard, but that will give you limited expansion space.
    The breadboard I show in these pictures provides two 800-terminal breadboards with dual power rails for each one.
  2. an AVR programmer - we use the USBASP programmer here. I routinely find these on eBay for well under $5.00 delivered.
    If you choose a different model, you will need to modify the directions in this 'ible accordingly.
  3. a way to connect the programmer to your breadboard. I used one of the AVR Breadboard Adapters http://zenstore.granzeier.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=14, but you could also use The Real Eliot's USB Ghetto Development Environment http://www.instructables.com/id/EDRQZ56F5LD8KDX/, or any other AVR programming system.
  4. 3 low-voltage, low-current LEDs (plus one more if you would like a pilot light to indicate when your development kit is powered.
  5. 3 (or 4 if you use the pilot light) 360 ohm, 1/4 to 1/8 watt resistors to limit the current through the LED.
    You can get a pack of 6 LEDs and resistors from
    http://zenstore.granzeier.com/index.php ... ducts_id=1.
  6. 3 small NO, SPST, Momentary action pushbutton switches - one for the reset circuit, and two for experiments. http://zenstore.granzeier.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=2
  7. a small speaker. (http://zenstore.granzeier.com/index.php ... ucts_id==5)
  8. An Atmel AVR ATtiny2313 microcontroller (this is also included in the Granzeier Consulting kit.)
  9. optional - a 5V power source. Your development kit can be totally powered by the programmer, this is only needed if you would like to disconnect your computer and take your experiments out to show them off. The kit comes with a battery box, using 4 AA-cells for a total of 4.8V or 6V, depending upon the type of cells used.

The build:
First, place the Tiny2313 chip and the programming header. Using the pinout of the 2313 and the AVR programming cable, it is just like playing dot-to-dot when you were a kid (err, sort of. )
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Next, I added a few LEDs along with their current limiting resistors, going to ground (you may want to have some going to +Vcc, for negative logic.)
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After this, I placed a few small NO pushutton switches and connected them to ground.
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Lastly, I added a small speaker.
Image

This will give you a small, simple dev kit. From here you can add whatever you want. For the simple stuff, you don't even need to add anything except the jumper wires to connect your peripherals to the Tiny2313.
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This has been a brief overview of building the development kit for my book. In the book, I introduce programming one statement at a time, and then drill that into the students before adding another statement.
Last edited by Sparky on Sat May 23, 2015 12:14 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: The Tiny2313 Experimenter System (Completed)

Postby Savage///Circuits » Sat May 23, 2015 12:00 pm

This was a good thread to save. I would not have migrated this thread to the new site since it was primarily discussion and not my content. But a good thing to keep alive.
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Re: The Tiny2313 Experimenter System (Completed)

Postby Granz » Sun May 31, 2015 3:41 pm

Savage///Circuits wrote:This was a good thread to save. I would not have migrated this thread to the new site since it was primarily discussion and not my content. But a good thing to keep alive.

This is my content, and I feel very honored to have this migrated over to ZappMan's new board. Thank you for thinking that this was worth saving on your board, ZappMan.
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Re: The Tiny2313 Experimenter System (Completed)

Postby JDISME » Mon Jun 01, 2015 11:30 pm

Super cool, this looks like a great starting point for anyone wanting to play with ATMEL chips. Thanks for sharing, I have not broke into my ATMEL boards yet but will be in the coming years. Still running on a temp system, I've been moving around a lot lately and getting my office back. I'm sure I will re-visit this thread once I break out my ATMEL boards.
~JD

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Re: The Tiny2313 Experimenter System (Completed)

Postby Granz » Tue Jun 02, 2015 12:00 am

Thanks for the kind comments, JD.

This is actually a summation of an Instructable (http://www.instructables.com/id/Learn-About-Microcontrollers/) that I did as a summation of my book/kit. When I posted this, it was really just an "announcement" about my 'Ible, but Chris asked me to add more info about the project so that it could be duplicated by S///C readers, without having to go to Instructables. Also, since the average S///C (and ZappBots) reader is smarter than the average mutt off the street, I was able to leave a lot of the intro stuff out.

The Instructable has 18, very large, steps, and actually goes into the "What is a Microcontroller" stuff, and how to install the software, and follows up with some step-by-step getting started in programming the '2313. The book goes even further, with over 100 pages, by including a quiz at the end of each chapter (for a full home-schooling course,) and the completed, tested programs at the end of the book. The book also came with a complete kit with a PCB and all parts to build the '2313 dev kit. In the Instructable, in the Introduction, there is a link to a PDF of the entire book (I just checked and the link is still good,) you may download the book and have the full course using the dev kit shown above (or in the Instructable.)

Of course, for more advanced work, this kit may also be used with Atmel's Studio 5 (or whatever version you have,) GCC, or even (with some additional files) with the Arduino IDE.
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