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Raspberry Pi Model B thread from Savage///Circuits 6/11/2013 to 8/18/2014

This is the Place to talk about Raspberry Pi single board computers
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Raspberry Pi Model B thread from Savage///Circuits 6/11/2013 to 8/18/2014

Postby zappman » Thu May 14, 2015 12:18 pm

June 11th, 2013, 10:51 PM
zappman
Raspberry Pi Model B


Went to my local Microcenter store to buy some blank DVDs yesterday.
Looked at their DIY section, it had a lot more products stocked than it used to.
I saw they had the Raspberry Pi Model B in stock for $39.99 and could not resist buying one.

Image

What a great little board, I amazed what it can do, and how easy it is to use.
I am making this post using the Raspberry Pi.
I had all the pieces needed to make the Pi work: USB Keyboard and Mouse, 4 Gig microSD Card with full size adapter, HDMI cable, Ethernet cable and 1080p TV.
First, I used my 7 inch TV with composite input and a pair of self powered speakers, but the 1080p TV
is much better.

Using a Radio Shack Power Adapter with built in LiON battery, via micro USB cable for power. The PI is running off battery power as I write this post.

Downloaded the PI software using my laptop, and copied onto the SD card, put the SD card in the PI, connected the cables, powered it up, ran the configuration program and everything works perfect.

I have 2 projects in mind, for the PI:
  • A media player hooked up to my TV
  • An add on for use with my robot to give it increased capability

So far I would rate my Raspberry Pi 5 out of 5 stars.

June 12th, 2013, 02:39 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I feel like the only person I know who doesn't have one of these. I even know some people who don't know how to program them who at least have one. But for me right now it would be a distraction. So I think I will resist until the site is back up and a few videos are done.

June 12th, 2013, 04:32 PM
eod_punk
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Very nice find Zappman. Your not the only one who doesn't have one Chris. I wonder why the beagle board doesn't get more love as I believe it is pretty much the same thing just with more I/O.

June 12th, 2013, 05:33 PM
dmlandrum
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


The new BeagleBone Black has a faster processor, more RAM, and a lot more digital I/O, and costs $10 more. It's also a more recent design, and if I read everything right, the Raspberry Pi's GPU is superior, which still makes it the better choice for building streaming media boxes and the like.

I have two Raspberry Pis. :) I had projects in mind for them, but I got too inundated with projects, so it's all on hold now.

June 12th, 2013, 07:01 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Originally Posted by dmlandrum
I had projects in mind for them, but I got too inundated with projects, so it's all on hold now.

Story of my life!

June 12th, 2013, 09:43 PM
dmlandrum
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I know the feeling. I just have too many projects, and I need to concentrate on fewer at a time.

I still have two 6581 SID chips, and I was going to use an R-Pi to control them and act as a front-end. Assuming they still work.

June 13th, 2013, 02:54 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


You have SID chips? They're worth more than their weight in gold if they work.

June 13th, 2013, 04:48 PM
dmlandrum
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Got them for the price of a case of Dr. Pepper. Actually, I got a pair of whole C64s. That was about... 6-7 years ago or so. I need to figure out a way to test them.

My first idea was to get two more and make a four-voice polysynth. However, as you say, they are insanely expensive lately, and finding two more with the same datecodes (there were differences in construction through the years) would be tricky. So now I'm thinking that two SIDs together would make a pretty cool monosynth. I'm still trying to figure out some "angle" to how to approach the design and interface, though. One guy eschewed the use of a keyboard and built something that looks more like an Akai MPC-like thing.

June 14th, 2013, 03:52 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I've been keeping my eyes open. It's funny...in 1998 I gave away some 25 C=64s and about a dozen other Commodore computers including a couple of 128s, a 128D and a few Amigas including a 1200. At the time I just had so much stuff and was not doing anything with any of it. Now I wish I had the entire collection back considering how things have been since then.

June 14th, 2013, 07:11 PM
zappman
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I have 2 projects in mind, for the PI:

  • A media player hooked up to my TV


I am making some progress with the Raspberry Pi.
It is now configured as a media player hooked up to my TV.
I swapped out the the Pi's SD card for another, and Turned my Raspberry Pi into a full featured XBMC Media Center.

Here is a link to how to do this:

http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/54...ess/index.html

I actually used the "simple UI installer for Raspbmc" found on the page at this link.

http://www.raspbmc.com/download/

I am listening MP3s using the PI setup and configured with "Raspbmc" as I type this post on my laptop.

I added a 4 port (unpowered) USB Hub to my setup, so that I can plug a USB Flash Drive into the PI along with the keyboard and mouse.


@Chris, I went to a Hamfest on Memorial Day 2013 and picked up a Commodore 1541 Floppy Drive for $1.00; the seller told me he sold his C64 to someone else about 3 minutes before I got there.

I guess one more thing I might do with the PI is install the C64 emulator.

June 14th, 2013, 09:50 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Quote:
Originally Posted by zappman View Post
@Chris, I went to a Hamfest on Memorial Day 2013 and picked up a Commodore 1451 Floppy Drive for $1.00; the seller told me he sold his C64 to someone else about 3 minutes before I got there.
Ouch...

June 19th, 2013, 08:24 AM
blittled
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I also have a Raspberry Pi Version B. I'm using it as a NAS. I have a samba server with a 1TB external USB Hard drive. I also have set up a DLNA and it streams video well. I added a Web Server and mySQL to try some web pages. The only issues I have with it so far is the VNC server doesn't work well and I cannot connect any Linux computer to the Samba server... yet.

June 25th, 2013, 07:23 PM
doc
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B

I recently got an R-Pi too. There's a few guys into them a the hackerspace I joined. I haven't really had a chance to do much with it yet but it appears to have a lot of potential for fun projects.

No leads on any C-64 stuff around here. Sorry.

Doc

June 26th, 2013, 12:08 AM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Doc's got one too!?!??!?? I really am the only person I know without one. Figures! :roll:

June 26th, 2013, 12:38 AM
zappman
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B

Making a little progress with the Raspberry Pi.

I now have Wi-Fi working, so I don't need the Ethernet cable stretched across the floor.

I am using a Tenda W311M 150Mbps Wireless N USB 2.0 Adapter (UPC 885397090083) http://www.microcenter.com/product/373032/W311M_150Mbps_Wireless_N_USB_20_Adapter for $9.99 at Micro Center, plugged it in and it works!

It looks just like the Wi-Pi Wireless N USB 2.0 Adapter (UPC 086002017567) http://www.element14.com/community/docs/DOC-48541/l/wi-pi-wlan-usb-module-for-the-raspberry-pi for $12.99 at Micro Center http://www.microcenter.com/product/414645/Wi-Pi_Raspberry_Pi80211n_Wireless_Adapter but costs less.

Wi-Fi adapter is plugged directly into one of the USB connectors on the Pi.

Image

I plugged a non-powered 4 port USB hub that has a keyboard and mouse plugged attached, into the Pi's 2nd USB connector.

June 26th, 2013, 09:43 AM
eod_punk
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Your not alone Chris. I think its time we take a stand and just say no to Pi! :grin:

June 26th, 2013, 05:55 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Sounds like a plan! ;) I know I keep commenting on not having one, but in all fairness if I did, I wouldn't have the time to play with it. No to Pi until Pi day! :sneaky:

June 26th, 2013, 06:02 PM
doc
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Pi day it is then. Honestly I haven't had the time to play with it more than setting up.

June 26th, 2013, 06:12 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


No time? Funny, because what I'm most jealous of isn't that you guys have the Pi and I don't...it's that you have the time to play with it and still play with your other toys. :angel:

June 26th, 2013, 10:48 PM
doc
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I seem to be an a compressed air cannon kick lately. :whistling:

June 27th, 2013, 06:39 PM
zappman
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I added pictures to post 1 and 15 of this thread.

June 28th, 2013, 03:13 PM
sisktom
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


I got a R-P mid winter and have only played with it a bit.

I got the system online and spent some time using the ssh capability and also got the graphical interface to work from outside my local network. Not too complicated but a bizarre string of downloads, installs and maybe/mights that is the earmark of all things Linux.

Have also dabbled with the GPIO and have that working over the 'net as well.

So far, Python has been adequate for doing the things I've tested.

All in all, good fun!

Tom

June 28th, 2013, 03:32 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


So, not having one of these I am asking blind questions...but you need to be able to program in Python to really use the R-Pi then?

July 11th, 2013, 04:18 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Okay, Raspberry Pi? This guy http://techcrunch.com/2013/07/11/raspberry-pi-microwave-hack/ reminds me of me! Now THIS is a hack! Love this project http://techcrunch.com/2013/07/11/raspberry-pi-microwave-hack/ and how much he put into it. Here's a video from the linked page.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?;v=e2YtARzJTys

July 11th, 2013, 05:05 PM
zappman
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Originally Posted by Chris Savage
So, not having one of these I am asking blind questions...but you need to be able to program in Python to really use the R-Pi then?

No, you don't need to be able to program in "Python", the Raspberry Pi runs Linux, there are many different languages you can run.

Great find on the "Raspberry Pie" video, I especially liked "the ending" :P

May 13th, 2014, 11:19 PM
Granz
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Originally Posted by Chris Savage
Doc's got one too!?!??!?? I really am the only person I know without one. Figures! :roll:

Well, maybe not the only one, but now there is one less person who is on your side. :twisted:

I recently received a Pi as a gift and spent a good chunk of today setting it up. Most of the trouble has stemmed from the fact that I do not have a monitor or television which can take HDMI input. The Pi really, really does not like going to a regular analog television.

Lessons learned:
1) When you first install the OS, using the RCA video output, you will not get ANY video display at all - this can be temporarily fixed by pressing the 2 (or possibly 3 or 4) key on the keyboard. After you do this, you are supposed to save the new video mode somehow, but I did not see how to do that. If you are not able to save the video mode, then the OS installer program (NOOBS) will set the OS up for HDMI output. After the OS is installed, the system will reboot, but you will not see anything - shut the Pi off, remove the SD card, insert it into another computer and edit the CONFIG.TXT file. Look for the line, near the bottom, with "hdmi_force_hotplug" and comment it out (place a # at the beginning of the line.) Place the SD card back into the Pi, and power it back up. (http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/vi...p?f=63&t=60233)

2) There just ain't enough USB ports on a Pi - I have the bare minimum of a keyboard, mouse and WIFi dongle. Supposedly, an unpowered hub will not work, but play around with it. I managed to get all three working by plugging the USB hub and the keyboard into the Pi, and the mouse and WiFi dongle into the hub. It's worth a try, ya know?

3) Raspbian (the Debian port for the Pi) does not like low-resolution displays. Every app, or window, that I open is bigger than the screen (that may be a result of not saving the RCA video out mode in NOOBS.) I found HDMI-to-VGA adaptors on eBay for $2.20 each, with free shipping (http://www.ebay.com/itm/171314495120...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT.) If the auction that I used is over, just search for "HDMI to VGA convertor."

Hopefully, this will save some time for someone who does not have a HDMI television or monitor.

Now, to get the serial I/O working and download a terminal, like PuTTY. After that, a nice programming language and some Atmel AVR and Prop development tools... :clap:

May 14th, 2014, 06:13 PM
dmlandrum
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


You know, I still haven't used my Pi in anything (I put the other one in the TFOTTPB). I still haven't ever even fired it up. And I'm sitting here thinking, "well, I also still have two SID chips..."

I'll bet the Pi would be fast enough to control both chips, provide some extra envelopes for the filters, maybe an LFO, and a nice user interface using one of the many touchscreens available, and still write it all in Python. The only problem is going to be the number of pins. Each SID needs 13 pins, 8 data, 5 address, to control it. I'm thinking I might have to get a couple of 8-bit 2-to-1 multiplexers for that. That would need 14 pins. It has 17 available, some with special functions I might need. I'll have to look into this.

I suppose shift registers would also be an option. That would be a bit tougher to program, though.

EDIT: Actually, a few more pins per SID are required, as I forgot about the write-enable, reset, and all that fun stuff. However, this might also be a way out.

In order to write to the SID, you need to bring one of the pins low for a set period of time. So, this can act like a chip select, wherein I just wire the address and data lines to both chips to the Pi, then select which chip is getting written to by which /CS pin I bring low. In fact, the datasheet suggests this method for controlling multiple SIDs.

I should consider reading more. :)

So it looks like my total pin count needs to be... 8 + 5, so 13, plus 2 /CS and 1 /RES (that can be wired to both chips to reset both at the same time), so 16 pins. There is also an R/W pin to determine if the SID is being read from or written to, but since I'll only ever be writing to it, I'll just leave these low.

The thing is, if the Pi has 17 GPIO pins, and I need two of then for TX/RX for MIDI, I'm short 1 pin. Indeed, it looks like that's the case.

I might be getting a Beaglebone Black for this one. Also, I have no way of looking at my Pi board and telling what hardware revision it is, and that kinda pisses me off. Really? I have to boot it up and look at /proc?

EDIT 2: Wow, the price of the Beaglebone Black has gone up in the past few months...

EDIT 3: How good would the Prop do with this? It definitely has enough pins. I was hoping for a really nice whiz-bang touchscreen interface, though, which would be easier to accomplish in something like Python running on an operating system with the right drivers. Actually, to be honest, implementing a touchscreen with the Prop is kinda frightening me.

EDIT 4: Or I could just make two separate SID synths configured as modules in a larger modular system.

Screw this, I'm gonna go for a walk.

June 18th, 2014, 03:18 PM
zappman
Back to the Raspberry Pi Model B, with SimpleIDE and the Propeller QuickStart Board


I am finally getting back to working with my Raspberry Pi Model B.

This post is being written on the Pi using the Chromium web browser.

This time around I have changed some of the peripherals I am using, the new items are listed below:

19" Monitor connected using a HDMI cable and a HDMI to DVI adapter
Logitech K400r Wireless Keyboard with touchpad
Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball
Logitech X-140 2.0 Speakers

After I got the Pi fired up, I updated its Linux software to the latest packages and downloaded and installed LibreOffice and a couple games, to make sure my setup is in good working order.

Then using information found at http://learn.parallax.com/propeller-...de/raspberrypi as a general guide, I downloaded and installed SimpleIDE onto the Pi.

I connected by Propeller QuickStart Board Rev A to the Pi, powered everything up and have been successful programming the QuickStart Board with the Raspberry Pi Board.

Then, I updated my SimpleIDE "Learn Folder", the Learn folder contains C code in the Simple Libraries and Examples folders that you need for the Propeller C Tutorials. It is important to always use the latest version.

June 18th, 2014, 03:50 PM
Chris Savage
Re: Back to the Raspberry Pi Model B, with SimpleIDE and the Propeller QuickStart Boad


Cool! Thanks for the update, zappman! :whoo:

June 18th, 2014, 09:59 PM
doc
Re: Back to the Raspberry Pi Model B, with SimpleIDE and the Propeller QuickStart Board


Yes. Thanks for the update zappman. I've been wanting to tinker with the R.pi some but time seems to be the hinderance lately. Your setup sounds cool.

Have you explored using the prop as a peripheral?

June 18th, 2014, 10:54 PM
zappman
Back to the Raspberry Pi Model B, with SimpleIDE & the Propeller Platform USB board


Chris and Doc, thanks for your encouragement.

I switched out the Propeller QuickStart board for a Propeller Platform USB Board in my set-up.

The Propeller Platform USB board is much more user friendly then the QuickStart board, especially the pin outs. Other advantages of the Propeller Platform USB board include; it is powered from an external power supply, has a power switch and micro-SD card slot.

Next, I connected a Ping sensor to the Propeller Platform USB Board and loaded a demo program into the board. The distance measured by the Ping Sensor is displayed on the monitor hooked up to the Pi, the distance data is displayed in the SimpleIDE Terminal window.

The capabilities and strengths of the two boards complement each other. Its kind of like they are co-processors.

In the little set-up I have put together the Ping Sensor connected to the Propeller is being used as a peripheral to the Pi, and the wireless keyboard and monitor connected to the Pi are peripherals to the Propeller. Isn't that neat!

June 24th, 2014, 07:06 PM
zappman
Re: Back to the Raspberry Pi Model B, with SimpleIDE & the Propeller Platform USB Bd


I picked up an Adafruit T-Cobbler Breakout Kit https://www.adafruit.com/products/1105 for the Raspberry Pi at my local Micro Center store and soldered the kit together. Just to be safe I did not solder the two 5 Volt pins into the board, since the Raspberry Pi runs on 3.3Vdc and placing 5 Volts on any of the Pi's I/O pins will damage the Pi. The T-Cobbler plugs in nicely to my bread board.

I checked out two Raspberry Pi books from my local public library; Raspberry Pi for Dummies http://www.raspberrypi.org/raspberry-pi-for-dummies/ & Raspberry Projects for the Evil Genius http://www.amazon.com/Raspberry-Pi-Projects-Evil-Genius/dp/0071821589.

I followed the examples in chapters 1 & 2 of Raspberry Projects for the Evil Genius, learning how to toggle the Raspberry Pi's GPIO pins.
I followed the examples in chapter 3 of Raspberry Projects for the Evil Genius, learning how to play MP3 and WAV files.

I have installed and used the eSpeak http://espeak.sourceforge.net/ text to speech program , a compact open source software speech synthesizer, to make the Pi speak by typing in text phrases.

June 27th, 2014, 10:30 AM
zappman
Using a Wi-Fi VNC with the Raspberry Pi, SimpleIDE and a Propeller Board


I can now, wirelessly control my Raspberry Pi from my laptop running Windows using a VNC (Virtual Network Connection) .

I followed this tutorial "Installing VNC" https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-raspberry-pi-lesson-7-remote-control-with-vnc/installing-vnc.

I have a "Ping sensor" connected to a "Propeller Platform USB Board".
The "Propeller Platform USB Board" is connected to the "Raspberry Pi" via a non-powered USB Hub.

SimpleIDE is installed on the Raspberry Pi, and can be used to write Propeller chip code, and program the code into the Propeller chip.

My Raspberry Pi is connected to may LAN (Local Area Network), as is my laptop.

I can start the "VNC Sever" on the Raspberry Pi, and the "VNC Client" on my laptop, giving me full wireless control of the Raspberry PI.

Doing this, lets my laptop act as a "remote desktop" (Keyboard, Mouse and Display) of the Raspberry Pi.

Using the "remote desktop" I can use the Raspberry Pi to load a demo program into the Propeller board, and have the Propeller chip run the program.

The distance measured by the Ping Sensor and the Propeller board, then distance data is displayed in a SimpleIDE Terminal window shown the "remote desktop" shown on my laptop.

Remember the "Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board & Ping Sensor" are sitting on one side of the room, and my "laptop" is sitting on the other side of the room, they are talking wirelessly.

I believe this set-up could be useful ;).

June 27th, 2014, 11:14 AM
Chris Savage
Re: Using a Wi-Fi VNC with the Raspberry Pi, SimpleIDE and a Propeller Board


Very nice! Of course, until I break down and get a Pi, I will experience this stuff vicariously through you guys! :popcorn:

July 4th, 2014, 12:42 PM
zappman
Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


I am having some more fun with the Raspberry Pi.

I went to my local library and found the book "Make: Sensors" http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920030317.do. On its front cover it says "Projects and Experiments to Measure the world with Arduino and Raspberry Pi".

I followed the instructions on page 26 & 27 to install the Arduino IDE onto Ubuntu Linux, on my Raspberry Pi. The Raspberry Pi is not running Ubuntu Linux but the instructions worked on the Pi's Linux.

I then plugged my Arduino Uno into the USB hub connected to my Raspberry Pi, and started up the Arduino IDE. I was then able to compile and upload a "Blink LED" program to the Arduino Uno board.

But here is the neat part, I still have my Propeller Platform USB plugged into the USB hub attached to the Raspberry Pi. So I open up SimpleIDE and can still program and talk to the Propeller Board.

Raspberry Pi, Propeller Platform USB and Arduino Uno equals Hat-Trick

July 4th, 2014, 09:11 PM
Granz
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


Originally Posted by zappman
I am having some more fun with the Raspberry Pi.

I went to my local library and found the book "Make: Sensors". On its front cover it says "Projects and Experiments to Measure the world with Arduino and Raspberry Pi".

I followed the instructions on page 26 & 27 to install the Arduino IDE onto Ubuntu Linux, on my Raspberry Pi. The Raspberry Pi is not running Ubuntu Linux but the instructions worked on the Pi's Linux.

I then plugged my Arduino Uno into the USB hub connected to my Raspberry Pi, and started up the Arduino IDE. I was then able to compile and upload a "Blink LED" program to the Arduino Uno board.

But here is the neat part, I still have my Propeller Platform USB plugged into the USB hub attached to the Raspberry Pi. So I open up SimpleIDE and can still program and talk to the Propeller Board.

Raspberry Pi, Propeller Platform USB and Arduino Uno equals Hat-Trick

I could use those instructions - would there be any way that you could scan those two pages for those of us with Pi's?

July 5th, 2014, 04:51 AM (Post 37)
zappman
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


Originally Posted by Granz
I could use those instructions - would there be any way that you could scan those two pages for those of us with Pi's?

Here is my version of the instructions.

How to connect your Arduino Uno to your Raspberry Pi Model B running Linux

  • Connect your Arduino to the Raspberry Pi using a USB cable.
    Or connect the Arduino to the Raspberry Pi using a USB cable and USB Hub.
  • Power-up the Raspberry Pi and the Arduino
  • On the Raspberry Pi, start your command line terminal
  • To install the Arduino IDE, install the arduino package, by typing the following lines.
    $ sudo apt-get update
    $ sudo apt-get -y install arduino
  • Give yourself the permission to access the serial over USB port (this is required by the Arduino development environment to function).
    The first command adds you to the dialout group.
    The second command switches you into that group without you needing to log out and back in again:
    $ sudo adduser $(whoami) dialout
    $ newgrp dialout
  • Start Ardunio:
    $ arduino
  • The Ardunio IDE opens

After you have logged out and back in, you can also start the Arduino IDE from the menus.

Now you are ready to test your installation.

July 5th, 2014, 04:56 AM
doc
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


Originally Posted by Granz
I could use those instructions - would there be any way that you could scan those two pages for those of us with Pi's?

I suspect that is a copyright violation. The eBook is only $28 - might have to pick up a copy for myself.

July 5th, 2014, 09:41 AM
Granz
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


Originally Posted by doc
I suspect that is a copyright violation. The eBook is only $28 - might have to pick up a copy for myself.

Yeah, hadn't thought of that. Could you paraphrase the instructions instead, please? (unfortunately, being unemployed, and unemployment about to run out, $28 is still a bit too much. :()

July 6th, 2014, 03:16 PM
zappman
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


Originally Posted by Granz
Yeah, hadn't thought of that. Could you paraphrase the instructions instead, please? (unfortunately, being unemployed, and unemployment about to run out, $28 is still a bit too much. :()

Art, I guess you missed my post #37 in this thread?

Doc, per page xix of the book "Make: Sensors"
This book is to help you get your job done. In general, you may use code in this book in your programs and documentation. You do not require permission unless you're reproducing a significant portion of the code. For example, writing a program that uses several chunks of code from this book does not require permission. Selling or distributing a CD-ROM of examples from MAKE books does require permission. Answering a question by citing this book and quoting example code does not require permission. Incorporating a significant amount of example code from this book into your product's documentation does require permission



July 6th, 2014, 05:32 PM
Granz
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


Originally Posted by zappman
Art, I guess you missed my post #37 in this thread?
...
Zappman,


Wow, yes I did miss that. I still cannot figure out how I missed it, but there you are, I must have been asleep. :whistling:

Thanks for those directions.

July 6th, 2014, 06:03 PM
zappman
Re: Hat-trick: Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno


I have spent some time working with my : Raspberry Pi, Propeller Board and Arduino Uno setup today.

I found that every time I try to use the "Serial Monitor" that is part of the Arduino IDE, the Raspberry Pi gets bogged down and I can't use the Arduino IDE.

The "SimpleIDE Terminal" built into SimpleIDE works perfect.

I found a nice serial terminal control panel called "CuteCom" it functions well reading data from both my Propeller Board and Arduino Uno.

If "CuteCom" is not already installed on your Raspberry Pi you can install it using the following command:
sudo apt-get install cutecom

In CuteCom I must manually set the "Device" field by typing in the box, as follows for my setup:
  • Arduino Uno type in "/dev/ttyACM0"
  • Propeller Board type in "/dev/ttyUSB0"

July 7th, 2014, 10:49 PM
Blodgar
Re: Raspberry Pi Model B


Don't feel bad Chris! I don't have one of them in my zoo, either.

July 14th, 2014, 07:38 PM
zappman
The MagPi Magazine is a free resource for your Raspberry Pi


Here is a great resource for all the Raspberry Pi users out there.

It is The MagPi Magazine http://www.themagpi.com/issues/ and here is a neat thing, the magazine is available online for free, or you can pay for printed copies if you want them.

July 14th, 2014, 10:02 PM
Chris Savage
Re: The MagPi Magazine is a free resource for your Raspberry Pi


MagPi! AWESOME! :slick:

July 16th, 2014, 06:58 AM
doc
Re: The MagPi Magazine is a free resource for your Raspberry Pi

I ordered hard copies of volumes 1 & 2. Cool Mag!

July 17th, 2014, 11:13 AM
zappman
Programming your Raspberry Pi in C


You can program your Raspberry Pi using the C programming language, and resources you need to do the programming are free.

All you need to do is to install "Code::Blocks" http://www.codeblocks.org/ The open source, cross-platform IDE on your Raspberry Pi.
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You can install "Code::Bocks" on your Raspberry Pi using the following command;
sudo apt-get install codeblocks

When you install "Code::Bocks" the GNU GCC Compiler you need is also installed on you Raspberry Pi.

More information on the Raspberry Pi version of "Code::Bocks" can be found at the following links;
http://elinux.org/CodeBlocks
http://helloraspberrypi.blogspot.com/2014/03/install-codeblocks-on-raspberry-pi.html?view=snapshot
http://store.raspberrypi.com/projects/codeblocks

If you need are new to C programming, I have found a great book to help you.

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The book is "Beginning Programming with C for Dummies" http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118737636.html written by Dan Gookin.
It describes how to install "Code::Blocks" on the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems.
The book's illustrations and examples are specific to "Code::Blocks"

July 17th, 2014, 11:25 AM
Chris Savage
Re: Programming your Raspberry Pi in C


I'm tempted to get a C for Dummies book, just because at my age picking up yet another programming language is tedious, at best. I know several languages and C was the one that eluded me since the 90s. Now the company I work for is supporting it and I am behind the curve a little. :'(

July 17th, 2014, 04:35 PM
zappman
Re: Programming your Raspberry Pi in C


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Savage View Post
I'm tempted to get a C for Dummies book, just because at my age picking up yet another programming language is tedious, at best. I know several languages and C was the one that eluded me since the 90s. Now the company I work for is supporting it and I am behind the curve a little. :'(
Chris, I know how you feel. I am lucky that I was able to borrow a copy of "Beginning Programming with C for Dummies" from my local public library. I already had a copy of "Code::Blocks" installed on my laptop, because I want to Learn "C".

Now, I have "Code::Blocks" installed on my Raspberry Pi. I can program Propeller Boards connected to the Raspberry Pi using "SimpleIDE", but "SimpleIDE" is really setup to program the Propeller using "C" instead of "Spin".

Also, the Pololu Robot Control Board I have installed on my Stingray Robot needs to be programmed in C\C++.

Lastly, the programming language "Processing" used on the Arduino Boards is based on C\C++.

I have tied using some other "C" books, but "Beginning Programming with C for Dummies" seems to be book I need to understand the basics and syntax of C programming.

July 17th, 2014, 04:40 PM
zappman
Re: The MagPi Magazine is a free resource for your Raspberry Pi


Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
I ordered hard copies of volumes 1 & 2. Cool Mag!
Doc, I hope you enjoy reading your copies of the MagPi Magazine. I am glad you found my post useful. :D

August 17th, 2014, 11:53 PM
zappman
Raspberry Pi Model B Enclosure


I put my Raspberry Pi Model B into an enclosure.
The Pi fit very nicely into the enclosure.

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http://www.microcenter.com/product/4...closure_-_Blue

August 18th, 2014, 07:25 AM
doc
Re: The MagPi Magazine is a free resource for your Raspberry Pi


Originally Posted by zappman
Doc, I hope you enjoy reading your copies of the MagPi Magazine. I am glad you found my post useful. :D

They are great - very useful - Each volume (1 and 2) came with a really nice binder that makes them easy to maintain. I'm going to order volume 3 as soon as it's complete.
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JDISME
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Re: Raspberry Pi Model B thread from Savage///Circuits 6/11/2013 to 8/18/2014

Postby JDISME » Fri May 22, 2015 10:02 pm

I have a Pi and I have made a quick media center, but it was very basic. I totally want a Pi Microwave though. I think that is awesome that is does Voice recognition, bar scan (very functional), and with a tablet. What a project :)
Joshua Donelson


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